Surge In Indian Applicants For Master’s in AI at Overseas Universities

Source: The Economic Times

Students from India are increasingly travelling overseas in order to pursue Master’s degrees in Artificial Intelligence (AI). The number of applications for prospective Indian students has doubled in the last year alone.

The AI industry currently faces a talent in shortage and specialists are in high demand. Furthermore, 20-30% of students have been said to desire a master’s specialization over a MBA. Students see AI as a field that is not only trending upward in terms of popularity but one that will lead to employability.

Canada Could Overtake UK as Study Abroad Destination

Source: Study International

A recent survey suggests Canada is increasing in popularity as a study abroad destination among students around the world. Scholarship opportunities and the chance to work in the country upon graduating are among the top reasons students are now considering Canada more than the United States or United Kingdom. If this rise in popularity can be sustained, it is believed that Canada will host more international students than the UK in the years ahead.

Early Reports of Increased International Yield for Canadian Universities

Source: ICEF Monitor

Previous reports of significant increases in visa applications and admissions applications to Canadian universities are now being followed by corresponding growth in yield rates for 2017/18 admissions. Growth appears to be particularly notable for students from India.

This report can be read in its entirety via the ICEF Monitor website.

Why Canada Has Become A Destination of Choice for International Graduate Students

Source: University Affairs

Canadian Association for Graduate Studies President Brenda Brouwer explains that Canada’s standing as a safe, welcoming and multicultural country contributes to its desirability among international PhD degree-seeking students.

To read the complete article, please go to the University Affairs website.

MEA Launches Registration Module for Indian Students Abroad

Source: The New Indian Express

In the absence of any data on Indian students studying abroad, the government has launched a registration module for them so they could be reached in case of emergency.

For the full story, please visit The New Indian Express.

Western President Explores the Many Values of Intl. Ed.

Source: Universities Canada via Academica

“The intrinsic value of developing a broad world view through international education is self-evident,” writes [CIEC Academic Member] Western University President Amit Chakma. The author highlights a number of strides the federal government has made to boost the role of international education in Canada, which include rebranding the country as an education destination, improving the Express Entry program, and renewing the country’s commitment to study abroad. Chakma also takes time to remind readers that in addition to the country’s ambitious targets, “what’s more important to consider is the philosophy behind the idea, along with the merits of pursuing such a policy more aggressively to better support the development of our future global citizens.” Chakma concludes with a discussion of the barriers currently faced by students looking to pursue study abroad and how institutions and governments might better address them.

Institutions Should Better Promote the “Broadening” Effects of Travel Abroad

Source: Universities Canada via Academica

“If university is about higher education, international experience—travelling, working, or studying in other countries—is about broader education,” writes University of St Michael’s College President David Mulroney. The author reflects on the impact that his own travels abroad had on his undergraduate study and on his personal and intellectual development. Mulroney adds that the value of travel abroad, for him, is “the benefit of experiencing things for myself, testing my assumptions, and trying to see the world as others see it.” Mulroney concludes that Canada and its institutions need to do a better job of promoting opportunities for students to travel abroad, citing current statistics showing that while 97% of schools offer these opportunities, only 3% of students pursue them.

India: New Study Abroad Regulations to Improve HE Quality

Source: University World News

New regulations to allow Indian universities to collaborate with universities and colleges overseas and enable Indian students to gain credits for study abroad semesters were announced by India’s Human Resource Development Minister Smriti Irani recently. The measures are aimed at bringing world-class education to Indian students, as well as improving higher education curricula, through increased interaction with overseas universities.

For the full complete article, please visit University World News.

Canada Needs to Create More “Globally Competent” Graduates

Source: The Globe & Mail via Academica

“Business leaders want to hire graduates with international skills and perspectives, who are comfortable working across languages and cultures,” says Universities Canada President Paul Davidson. Yet challenges remain for the more than 80% of Canadian universities who have “internationalization” as part of their strategic plans. Recent data shows that only 3% of Canadian university students study abroad, and the article details some of the efforts that Canadian schools are making to help boost these participation rates.

Canada Must Work Quickly to Address Barriers for International Students

Source: University Affairs via Academica

Canada needs to act fast in order to gain the economic benefits associated with international students, writes Kareem El-Assal for University Affairs. Some barriers currently in place in Canada may deter prospective international students and steer them in another country’s direction. Obstacles such as slow student visa processing times, inadequate settlement and integration services, and difficulty attaining permanent residency are among issues potentially hindering Canada’s ability to recruit international talent. While the government has implemented a number of strategies to combat these issues, El-Essal says that further immediate action is required to ensure the successful recruitment and retention of future skilled workers to Canada.

Canadian Government Signals Renewed Openness to International Students

Source: University Affairs

According to Amit Chakma, president of [CIEC Academic Member] Western University and chair of the federal government’s Advisory Panel on Canada’s International Education Strategy, the Canadian government has recently shown positive signs towards international students hoping to study in Canada. By reviewing the steps these students must take to achieve permanent residency, in addition to changes made to citizenship requirements, Canada aims to make it easier for these students to pursue an education and work in the country after graduating.

For the full article, please visit University Affairs.

Importance of Becoming “Global Citizens” Through Study Abroad

Source: University Business Magazine via Academica

Study abroad is invaluable for “helping prepare our students to become global citizens,” writes college president John Roush, which is why Roush encourages “parents of college students in general to be supportive of their sons and daughters who seek to embark on similar experiences at whatever institution they attend.” Roush notes that as the world grows ever smaller, today’s PSE students will need to foster a greater understanding of how work is conducted on the global stage. The author concludes that study abroad experiences “will prepare young women and men to engage with others despite distance, language, and culture in whatever profession they choose, even if they never live or work abroad.”

I Took the Decision of Offering Myself the Greatest Gift: I Went to Study Abroad

I Took the Decision of Offering Myself the Greatest Gift: I Went to Study Abroad

Guest Contributor: Marie-Frédérique Ouellet

 

While taking a sip of my masala chai with alu paratha, I am staring at these kids throwing colorful powder at each other, laughing and running in every direction. The city is calm, the sun is clear and the air is fresh. So much to see, so much to taste, so much to discover: Welcome to India.

Even after two years, some people still ask with stupefaction, why I left Canada for India to pursue my Master’s Degree and if I did not have universities in my own country. Most of the time I quickly answer that I came to India to specialize in agriculture economics and Indo-Canadian relations but that is just one part of the truth. The other part is that after my undergraduate program, I made the decision of offering myself the greatest gift: I went to study abroad. I chose myself for two years. A gift from yourself to yourself that changes your whole perception of life and its intrinsic value. Studying abroad leaves you by yourself with your knowledge, culture and values in the middle of a whole new world where the culture is different, the religions are different, the language and food habits are different, where everything is to discover. The real challenge is to find the strength to adapt in this new world without losing who you are.

After my studies in International Economics and Development at the University of Ottawa, I wanted to become an economist. Specifically, I wanted to become a development economist. The kind that can bring efficient economic solutions and alternatives based on a deep understanding of the social, cultural and historical background. After my third year of Bachelor’s Degree, I was selected by the Ontario/Maharashtra Goa Student Exchange Program to pursue the Student India Program in Symbiosis International University in Pune, India. I came back to Canada to finish my last year of undergraduate studies and started to prepare my application to conduct a Master’s Degree in India. After my graduation, I received the Commonwealth Scholarship Plan in collaboration with the Indian Council for Cultural Relations and the Department of Foreign Affairs of Canada, which gave me the opportunity to pursue the Master’s Degree in Economics at Hyderabad Central University in India.

It took me almost a year to plan and prepare what was going to be the biggest trip of my life, with myself as my only travel partner and my humility and curiosity as carrying luggage. To anyone thinking about pursuing a degree or a semester abroad, few steps can guide you:

lmap1) Choose a country, read about its culture, history and social development. See if it peaks your curiosity to the point where you are determined to live and experince it by yourself.


2)
Look for the different educational programs that are offered by the host country and if the diploma obtained abroad will be recognized by your home country or own institution. You can discuss with your teachers and determinethe added-value of this diploma to your career. Discuss with your parents and friends about your project, ask their opinion and determine the pros and cons.

3) Look for scholarships offered by the Provincial and Federal governments, such as the Department of Global Affairs Canada, NGOs, organizations for international studies, LOGIQ for students from Quebec, Indian Council for Cultural Relations, Canada India Education Council, Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute, Commonwealth Scholarship Plan, Ontario/Maharashtra Goa Student Exchange Program. Also, many Canadian universities are offering scholarships to students willing to complete a semester abroad.

4) Construct a budget of the expected expenditures and fees. Try to determine the total cost of this project, including flight tickets, visa fees, accommodations and living expenditures, fix a budget if you want to travel across the country. By preparing your project in advance, you can find many helpful ideas, you can ask for the flight tickets as birthday or graduation gift from your family and friends, save money from part-time work to achieve this specific goal, work with NGOs and seek out sponsorships. If there is no solution, it is because there was no problem at the beginning.

5) Make an appointment at a travel health clinic. The specialists will give you advice and preventions for the specific country you will travel to, discuss with your doctor about the different options to ensure your security abroad. For example, ask about the prevention of malaria, hepatitis, rabies, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and if you should receive any specific vaccine before leaving.

6) Learn more about the culture, the university where you will study, the basic courtesies of the country, watch documentaries on the social challenges the country is facing, learn more about their history and language. The better your preparation, the easier your adaptation to this new environment will be.

7) Enjoy, learn, share and make a lot of friends.


lmapI hope this article brings to you the fire required to conduct what I believe is the biggest trip of your life. You will face challenges, culture shocks and misunderstandings, but you need to look beyond that. You will discover a new culture, make life-long friends, learn a new language, you will see landscapes that you can normally only see in movies. The memories and friendships created will remain long after the completion of your studies. By the way, the picture was taken in Munnar, Kerala in December 2015. Yes, life as an international student is pretty boring as you can see 😉  Give it a try, you will be surprised!

Indian States Support Opening Up to Foreign HE Providers

Source: The PIE News

Ten of India’s states have so far come out in favour of enabling foreign higher education institutions to operate in the country, but any new policy must ensure that foreign providers have something to offer domestic students, they have said.

There is currently no legislative framework in place to allow foreign universities to operate in India. The 2013 Foreign Education Providers Bill has been blocked from passing on several occasions, but last year Prime Minister Narendra Modi said that the government intends to let foreign providers operate campuses in the country.

For the full article, please visit The PIE News.

Indian Technology Institutes Open Admissions to Foreign Students

Source: ICEF Monitor

Earlier this year, India’s Human Resource Development Minister Smriti Irani approved a proposal that will see an initial 10,000 new seats opened for foreign students at the country’s premier engineering institutes. This marks the first time that admission in the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) has been opened to overseas students.

The proposal is clear that seats for foreign students will not come at the expense of Indian applicants. Rather, the aim is to add thousands of new seats across all IITs and to have overseas students pay a significant differential fee in the range of Rs 400,000-500,000 per year (US$6,000-US$7,500), as opposed to the Rs 90,000 annual tuition (US$1,350) required of Indian students.

For the the full article, please visit ICEF Monitor.

Canada Overhauls International Education Campaign

Source: The PIE News, Study International via Academica

This week, Canada unveiled its new EduCanada branding campaign to represent the country’s global education strategy. The brand was first presented at the annual AIEA conference in Montreal, and features a new logo along with the tagline, “A world of possibilities.” The branding will reportedly appear on all printed education materials from the federal, provincial, and territorial governments, as well as all Canadian universities that operate on an international scale. The new brand comes at the same time as Global Affairs Canada has produced a video promoting the country as one of the world’s top study abroad destinations. Increasing the global influence of Canada’s higher education sector was one of the main goals cited in the 2012 Global Affairs of the federal International Education strategy, which sought to double the number of international students in Canada to 450,000 by 2022.

PSE Institutions Need to Better Measure Value of Internationalization

Source: Times Higher Education via Academica

While many PSE institutions consider internationalization inherently good, few do an adequate job of measuring just how much value they provide to their international students, writes a contributor for Times Higher Education. Rather than asking only about inputs (e.g. the number of exchange agreements) or outputs (e.g. the number of outgoing students), institutions need to ask questions like “what was achieved by, say, increased student mobility? How was teaching, research or social engagement improved because of our internationalisation strategy?” Until schools are prepared to answer these questions in meaningful ways, the author concludes, internationalization efforts will remain shallow and ineffective.

CBIE Releases Brief on International Education Leadership

Source: CBIE via Academica

CBIE has released a new brief reviewing the current status of international education leadership and gaps identified in this area of the international education sector. The brief identifies eight unique types of leadership that are plotted on a quadrant based on their position (internal or external) and level of flexibility (flexibility or stability). CBIE study leaders compared the responses of emerging and experienced leaders on the nature of their current roles and the roles they identified as needing strengthening in the future. The groups agreed that it was important to improve their skills as mentors, innovators, and brokers. The brief makes a number of recommendations, including increased collaboration between new and veteran leaders in the field.

International Enrolment in Canada Increases by 10% from 2013 to 2014

Source: Canadian Bureau for International Education via Academica

International enrolment at Canadian schools increased by 10% from 2013 to 2014, according to a new report by CBIE. Students came primarily from China, India, South Korea, France, and Saudi Arabia, with 33% of the international student population coming from China. Just over half of the surveyed international students reportedly intended to apply for permanent residency after their studies. The survey revealed that international students were largely satisfied with their experience, with 95% reporting that they would recommend Canada as a study destination. “International education is critical to the future of Canada and Canadians,” said CEO and President of CBIE Karen McBride, who highlighted pathway programs as a great opportunity for Canadian higher education.

India Moots Inbound Campaign, Foreign Provider Bill

Source: The PIE News

Prime Minister Narendra Modi is ramping up efforts to promote India as a global study destination, planning a Study in India campaign and revisiting legislation to make it easier for foreign higher education providers to set up branch campuses in the country.

The Ministry of Human Resource Development has been in consultation with higher education institutions about how to increase the number of overseas students at Indian institutions, including through a Study in India campaign.

The plan is set to be included into the New Education Policy currently being drafted by Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party, and could include funding for selected institutions to develop the infrastructure to accommodate more international students.

For the full article, please visit The PIE News.

Why Indians Study Abroad

Source: Education Times

With a topic inspired by almost 10 years spent working within the Indian community in Australia and living in India, Nonie Tuxen’s thesis explores the growth of the ‘new’ Indian middle class and their desire for overseas education.

On her choice of topic, she says: “During my undergraduate, I worked part-time in an Indian restaurant and got a first-hand experience of Indian students’ dreams and aspirations to study overseas. Also, my parents had come to India for their honeymoon so I was quite interested about the country. I visited India many times over the years and witnessed the change in the country’s upwardly mobile middle class and their fascination for overseas education.”

Tuxen says that countries should understand the value of studying abroad for international students and allow work rights for at least two to three years. “My research indicates that gaining professional exposure in an international setting is a key factor in determining what and where young Indians choose to study.”

To read the full article, visit the Education Times.

Indian State Funds Study Abroad for Minority Students

Source: The PIE News

India’s Telangana state government has approved the first round of scholarships funding 258 low-income students to study abroad at postgraduate level, it has announced.

Earlier this year the Minorities Welfare Department for the southern Indian state announced that it was allocating INR25 crore (US$3.8m) to the new Chief Minister’s Overseas Study Scheme.

It will enable 500 students from low-income families to study abroad each year, with a third of the available places earmarked for women.

In order to apply, students must be no older than 35 and they or their guardians must have a total annual income of no more than Rs. 2 lakhs (US$3,000).

For more details, read the full story on The PIE News.

Study Abroad a Force for Peace, Even If It Does Not Build Sense of Community

Source: International Studies Quarterly via Academica

In the Washington Post, political science professor Calvert Jones has written about a recent study she conducted on over 500 study abroad participants at 11 US postsecondary institutions. Surprisingly, she said, the survey did not support the commonly held belief that cross-border contact “promotes a sense of shared international community.” However, the thesis that cross-border contact reduces the perception of threat was still supported. Finally, returning students displayed stronger feelings of nationalism, were prouder of their home country, and more patriotic; however they did not display an increased belief in American superiority. “Cross-border contact may still be a strong force for peace,” Jones concludes, “even if community is not the underlying mechanism.”

US News and World Report Encourages Enrolment in Canadian Universities

Source: US News & World Report via Academica

Obtaining a bachelor’s degree in Canada has the potential to offer a world-class education at a fraction of the price one might find in the US, UK, or Australia, says US News and World Report. According to the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE), 336,400 international students came to study in Canada in 2014 compared to 184,150 in 2008. US News and World Report adds that students planning to study outside the US should give strong consideration to Canada because of its affordable tuition rates and high-quality universities, quoting one student who celebrated receiving her Canadian education “without having to sell [her] kidneys to pay the tuition.”

International Students at Niagara Claim They Were Denied Work Permits for Taking Online Courses

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

More than 50 Niagara College students have sought legal representation after they were denied Canadian work permits, allegedly because they took online courses as part of their program. Ravi Jain, an immigration lawyer representing the students, says 30 of his clients have already received rejections on their work permit applications since graduating. While international students have received work permits in the past after completing Niagara’s programs, this year they say they are being refused because Citizenship and Immigration Canada considers online courses to be “distance learning.”

SK Grants Great Plains International Designation

Source: Great Plains College News Release via Academica

Great Plains College’s Swift Current campus has been awarded its international designation from Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Advanced Education. The designation means that international students will be able to enrol in the campus’s Business and Administrative Assistant programs. “We recognize the current and looming labour shortage in Saskatchewan and the desire to have access to skilled graduates,” says Keleah Ostrander, Great Plains’ Director of Planning. “By being able to accept international students and support them through post-secondary education, we are able to help meet the needs of employers in the province.” Great Plains is reportedly the second SK regional college to receive its international designation.

More Than Half of International Students Have no Canadian Friends

Source: Times Higher Education via Academica

According to Janine Knight-Grofe from the Canadian Bureau for International Education (CBIE), 56% of international students in Canada said they have no Canadian friends. “We are missing out on one of the strategic advantages of international education, one that we as international educators frequently tout,” Knight-Grofe said at last week’s annual conference of NAFSA: Association of International Educators. One-third of international students said they found it difficult to meet Canadian students and half experienced challenges meeting Canadians off campus. The issue is particularly acute for students from the Middle East and North Africa: only 28% of these students had any Canadian friends.

Lack of Resources and Coordination Contribute to Increased Processing Times for International Students

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

According to a Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) report obtained by the Globe and Mail, insufficient resources and lack of coordination have contributed to a 30% increase in processing times for study permits and a doubling of the processing time for temporary resident visas. While the federal government has pledged to double the number of international students by 2022, it has not provided sufficient resources to do so, according to [CIEC Academic Member] Western University President Amit Chakma. Universities Canada President Paul Davidson said, “the question of visa processing times is a critical one in terms of attracting top students. If our competitors are able to turn around visas faster, all the marketing efforts, all the recruitment efforts, all the offers of scholarships fail.”

Humber Recognized for International Outreach

Humber Recognized for International Outreach

Source: Humber College

The CICan Awards of Excellence, which recognize achievement within Canada’s college system, were handed out in a ceremony in Winnipeg this week. Humber College [CIEC Academic Member] was the recipient of a gold award for Internationalization Excellence.

Humber’s gold for Internationalization follows the 2014 launch of the college’s Internationalization Strategy.

“At Humber we are committed to ensuring that our students graduate with the skills needed to be successful as global citizens in an ever increasing interconnected world,” says Diane Simpson, dean of International. “This award recognizes the efforts of the institution to embrace this, and also to ensure that the opportunity is there for all students to engage in international opportunities, whether on campus or abroad.”

NAFSA Publishes International Education Professional Competencies

Source: CBIE News Release via Academica

US-based organization NAFSA: Association of International Educators this week released the International Education Professional Competencies, a list that defines the knowledge, skills, and abilities expected of international education professionals. The competencies include skills identified as being fundamental to all international education professionals, regardless of specialization. They are organized into four key practice areas: comprehensive internationalization, education abroad, international enrolment management, and international student and scholar services. The list also includes skills necessary to collaborate across international education domains. The Canadian Bureau of International Education (CBIE), sister association to NAFSA, welcomed the release, noting that while developed from a US perspective, the competencies are applicable in other contexts.