Over Half of Canada’s International Students Want to Stay After Graduation

Source: Study International

The results of a recent survey suggest that more than 60% of students who come to Canada to complete their post-secondary education hope to become permanent residents of ‘The Great White North’ after they graduate.

While pathways to citizenship currently exist for international students, both the government and various institutions feel more can be done. In the coming years, an increased number of employment opportunities, international programs and scholarships will be made available to help make these students feel more at home while they study abroad in Canada.

For further details on the study, visit Study International.

Canada Could Overtake UK as Study Abroad Destination

Source: Study International

A recent survey suggests Canada is increasing in popularity as a study abroad destination among students around the world. Scholarship opportunities and the chance to work in the country upon graduating are among the top reasons students are now considering Canada more than the United States or United Kingdom. If this rise in popularity can be sustained, it is believed that Canada will host more international students than the UK in the years ahead.

Early Reports of Increased International Yield for Canadian Universities

Source: ICEF Monitor

Previous reports of significant increases in visa applications and admissions applications to Canadian universities are now being followed by corresponding growth in yield rates for 2017/18 admissions. Growth appears to be particularly notable for students from India.

This report can be read in its entirety via the ICEF Monitor website.

Why Canada Has Become A Destination of Choice for International Graduate Students

Source: University Affairs

Canadian Association for Graduate Studies President Brenda Brouwer explains that Canada’s standing as a safe, welcoming and multicultural country contributes to its desirability among international PhD degree-seeking students.

To read the complete article, please go to the University Affairs website.

Canadian Unis Report Bump in Applications for 2017

Source: ICEF

Canadian universities are reporting significant increases in the number of foreign applications received for this year. For many institutions, year-over-year growth is often on the order of 20-30% or more.

The increase is being attributed to political developments in the UK and US, but also to expanded recruiting by Canadian institutions and the relative affordability of Canadian education.

For the full report, please visit the ICEF website.

Redefining the Role of the University in the Trump Era

Source: University World News

The last few weeks have been tremulous for Canada. The new leadership in the United States is changing all rules and no one knows for certain how far the changes will go. In the world of higher education, universities are trying to determine what the impact will be. Optimists are eager to benefit from the revenues of foreign students who see Canada as a safe alternative to the US.

For the full article, visit University World News.

Montreal Must Build on Success to Recruit Top Talent

Source: Montreal Gazette via Academica

Montreal has much to celebrate in being recently named the top city in the world for students, writes McGill University Principal Suzanne Fortier, but the city and its institutions still have much work to do to make the most of “an unprecedented opportunity to fulfill the potential of Montreal to draw talent from around the world.” Fortier highlights an aging domestic population as one of the most urgent reasons why Montreal needs to attract more immigration. The McGill principal adds that the city will also need to attract the world’s very best talent in order to maintain a vital society and strong workforce. “However, despite our city’s considerable attractions,” Fortier notes, “despite the clear benefits that international talent brings, Montreal and Quebec have room to improve.” The author offers a number of options to help Montreal move forward, which include the creation of a coordinated talent recruitment and retention strategy.

Montreal Knocks Off Paris As World’s Top City for Students

Source: Montreal Gazette via Academica

Montreal has beaten out London, Berlin, Boston, and Tokyo as the world’s best city for students, according to rankings compiled by Quacquarelli Symonds. The Montreal Gazette reports that Montreal’s desirability, affordability, and positive reviews from students propelled it from seventh place in 2016 to first place 2017. Montreal’s ranking was reportedly influenced heavily by the experience of students who have studied there. “A lot of people want to study in London, but those who have studied in London don’t necessarily have as positive an experience as they do in other places,” said Ben Sowter, head of research for QS. Other Canadian cities on the list included Vancouver (10th) and Toronto (11th). Ottawa received a first-place ranking in a category based on student perceptions.

Five Canadian Institutions Make THE’s “Most International” Universities Ranking

Source: Times Higher Education via Academica

Five Canadian universities have made the top 40 “most international” universities in the world, according to rankings released by Times Higher Education. The rankings are drawn largely from the “international outlook” section of the THE World University Rankings 2016-17, which covers international staff, students, and co-authors. However, the ranking also factors in a measure of universities’ international reputations. The University of British Columbia was Canada’s highest-ranked university in this regard, placing #12 in the world. McGill University was the second highest-ranked Canadian institution at #23, followed by the University of Alberta (#31), University of Toronto (#32), and University of Waterloo (#34).

Canada Beckons International Students With a Path to Citizenship

Source: New York Times

At the College of the North Atlantic here, a young Chinese woman stood discussing her future with two fellow students, a Bangladeshi man and a Korean woman, amid a flow of mostly pale Newfoundlanders in down coats and hoodies heading for class.

There’s No Canadian Harvard, and That’s A Good Thing

Source: National Post via Academica

“There is no Canadian equivalent of Harvard, with its prestige, limited enrollment and its $60,000 tuition. And really, it’s just as well,” writes Stephen Gordon for the National Post. Gordon argues that while some Canadian universities and programs have high entrance standards, gaining admission into one of these programs is “nowhere near as difficult as entering an elite U.S. college.” Gordon sees this characteristic of Canadian higher ed in a positive light, arguing that that social mobility is likely enhanced by the fact the the country’s higher education institutions are not as rigidly stratified as those in the US. “If—as available evidence suggests—Canadian social mobility is significantly greater than it is in the U.S., then much of the credit goes to the fact that there is no Canadian university that plays the prestige-signalling game that Harvard does,” concludes Gordon. “A ‘Harvard of Canada’ is the last thing we need.”

Canada Overtakes UK as ‘Most Desirable’ Country for EU Students

Source: Times Higher Education

Canada has overtaken the UK as the most attractive English-speaking country for European Union students, according to a study that highlights the damaging impact of the Brexit vote on the UK university sector. A survey of 219 international students at universities in the UK found that Canada was the most desirable English-speaking nation for EU students, followed by the UK, Australia, the US and New Zealand in last place.

For the complete article, visit Times Higher Education.

Canada Should Capitalize on Perfect Storm of Talent Recruitment

Source: University Affairs via Academica

“The perfect storm of political upheaval has happened from an academic recruitment point of view,” writes David Kent for University Affairs, citing Brexit and the election of Donald Trump as factors that may drive more highly talented researchers to Canadian universities. While researchers often consider salary an important factor when weighing competing offers, Kent writes that these decisions are impacted by a number of other concerns. “In the Trump, post-Brexit world, Canada starts ticking a lot of boxes in comparison to other places,” the author concludes. “Universities in Canada need to consider this set of circumstances swiftly and attract the best and brightest into long-term positions with real institutional commitment to their future success.”

Canada: International Student Spending Hit $11.4bn in 2014

Source: The PIE News

Spending by international students and their visiting friends and family amounted to a net CAN$11.4bn in 2014, up from $8bn four years earlier, according to the federal government’s new economic impact study. Canada’s international education services now account for 11% of the country’s service exports.

For the complete article, visit The PIE News.

Quebec Announces $12M in University, College Grants

Source: La Presse via Academica

Quebec Minister of Higher Education Hélène David announced this Monday that the province will inject an additional $12M in grant funding for the province’s CEGEPs and universities. The funds were made available immediately and are marked to be spent by the end of the fiscal year on March 31, 2017. Of the $12M, $2.7M will be used to mentor and retain foreign students. Another $3.2M will be used to increase the supply of continuing education programs, while $3M will be devoted to providing more resources for student success. The remainder will be used for various measures such as support for innovation, strengthening French language proficiency among students, and intervention practices against sexual violence and radicalization.

Canada: “A Place of Stability, of Openness, of Inclusiveness”

Source: Times Higher Education via Academica

Canada’s decision to welcome thousands of Syrian refugees “stands out as an important symbol” of the country’s “openness and eagerness to attract newcomers,” says University of Toronto President Meric Gertler in an interview with Times Higher Education. Gertler highlights a number of significant steps Canada has taken to be open compared to the isolationist tendencies of Brexit and the Donald Trump presidential campaign. These include Canada’s efforts to attract 450,000 international students by 2022, its amendments to its citizenship process for international students, and its increased investment in research and scientific infrastructure. “Canada has certainly emerged as a place of stability, of openness, of inclusiveness,” says Gertler. “I think we’re doing many things right now that will position us as a stark alternative to things that are happening in other countries, including the UK and the US.”

Mental Health Efforts Made by Toronto-based PSE Institutions

Source: Torontoist via Academica

The Torontoist has released an article highlighting how three universities and three colleges based in Toronto are working to support student mental health issues. The piece focuses on what programs and events the schools offer on top of existing counselling programs that are available on most campuses; it examines the efforts of Ryerson University, the University of Toronto, York University, Humber College, Seneca College, and George Brown College, as well as collaborative efforts between the institutions. Among these collaborative efforts is Mindfest, an event organized collaboratively between OCAD University, Ryerson University, and the University of Toronto that includes information sessions and a club night to help raise students’ awareness of the mental wellness programs available to them on their home campuses.

International Students Praise Canada’s Openness & Affordable Fees

Source: The PIE News

Competitive fees and attractive post-study work options are some of Canada’s most magnetic features drawing international students to its shores. Word of mouth recommendations, however, remain powerful influences when students are choosing a study destination.

For the complete post, please visit The PIE News.

Nova Scotia Invites Students to Study & Stay

Source: The PIE News

Nova Scotia has launched two initiatives aiming to entice international student to stay, work and possibly immigrate after they graduate, in order to shore up the province’s ageing and shrinking workforce.

To read the complete article, visit The PIE News.