New Dynamic Era of India-Canada Relations

Source: New Delhi Times

Jordan Reeves, Consul General of Canada in Mumbai says that he is upbeat about the rise of Canadian equity investment in India. He further says that Canadian investors are bullish on the Indian economy as is evident from the fact that they have made around $11 billion investment in India in the last year. Canada is also a major collaborator towards the realisation of the skill initiative. In April 2015, during PM Modi’s visit to Canada, education and skills development were identified as priorities. Thirteen MoUs were signed between India’s National Skill Development Council and Canadian colleges and institutes to formalise skills collaboration in various sectors. Modi also agreed to take concrete measures to expand bilateral cooperation in key areas including the economy, trade and investment, civil nuclear cooperation, energy, education and skills development, agriculture, defence and security, science, technology, innovation and space, culture, and people to people tie.

For the full article, visit the New Delhi Times.

Business-PSE Partnerships Are Critical for Canada’s Prosperity

Source: The Globe & Mail via Academica

Partnerships between PSE and business are essential for making Canada a more competitive and prosperous country, according to Conference Board of Canada CEO Daniel Muzyka. A recent Conference Board study shows that such partnerships provide businesses with greater access to world-class expertise and resources, which boosts their capacity for innovation and fosters economic growth. NSERC Vice-President of Research Partnerships Bettina Hamelin adds that these partnerships often include local communities and address a host of challenges ranging from food security to quantum technology. “The list is long,” she adds, “and the challenges may be local, provincial, national or global.” The article concludes by discussing specific examples of PSE-business partnerships and how industry, higher education, and local communities have benefitted from them.

Synergy 2016: Call for Proposals

In keeping with past ‘Synergy’ events (organized since 2007) which have tended to attract thought leaders from leading Colleges and Universities, we invite you to participate and add to the ongoing dialogue between academics of both countries. In order to expand this ‘dynamic and burgeoning’ corridor, we need to constantly share ideas on new initiatives and best practices. Sessions at ‘Synergy’ are intended to encourage frank and candid discussion and allow  sharing of experiences and an understanding on what works (and what doesn’t) via a medium of workshops, presentations and panel discussions in a multitude areas.

Attendees at past ‘Synergy’ Conferences have tended to be senior level administrators and academics from both countries and your presentation should take that into consideration. You can make a safe assumption that they have a basic knowledge of and | or are already involved in the ‘Canada-India education corridor’. This session could be a great opportunity to highlight / showcase your academic programs and/or get feedback from your peers in the audience.

Finally, please indicate the length of your presentation/workshop (20 or 30 minutes each) and specify if you require AV and/or other technical equipment. A laptop, projector & screen will be made available.

Potential Criteria for Choosing Presentations: 
  1. Clearly outline the context for the presentation, the target audience it wishes to address and should have a direct relevance to current issues relating to the theme/title of your presentation.
  2. Presentation should have a good mix of obvious practical applications and identify whether it is suitable for newcomersor geared toward experienced professionals.
  3. Present a clear argument & articulate your position (for or against & have moderator sum up the ‘round table’).

Please send us a 50 word (mini) session description to info@CanadaIndiaEducation.com by May 31, 2016 along with your session title and names of co-presenters (if any)  and we will follow up/notify you if we have questions.  All (co) presenters and panelists will receive discounted registration fee at the member rate.

Look back at Synergy 2015 & view the Event Agenda…

International Experience Becoming Essential for MBA Programs

Source: Canadian Business via Academica

International business experience is quickly becoming an essential part of an MBA graduate’s CV, reports Canadian Business. As a result, more of the country’s MBA programs are adding international exchanges and fellowships to their curricula. Some major business schools that have recently added these components are the Sobey School of Business at Saint Mary’s University, the Rotman School of Business at the University of Toronto, and the Asper School of Business at the University of Manitoba.

Edu-Canada Canadian MBA Showcase Tour 2015

Source: Indo-Canadian Business Chamber via High Commission of Canada

Following on the success of the inaugural Edu-Canada Canadian MBA Showcase Tour in September 2014, the High Commission of Canada in India is pleased to announce the 2015 Edu-Canada Canadian MBA Showcase Tour. Once again co-organized with the Indo-Canadian Business Chamber (ICBC), this second iteration will visit Bengaluru, Chennai, Mumbai, Delhi, and Chandigarh. Canadian universities offering MBA programs to international students will be highlighting their course offerings, scholarships, student experience, accessibility, affordability, and career paths in an all-Canada context.

Business Dean Calls for Adaptive MBA Programs

Source: University Business via Academica

MBA programs must capitalize on innovative educational technologies and rethink their traditional student bodies if they wish to keep pace with the changing demands of the international business world, writes Judy Bullock, University Dean of Business at American InterContinental University. For Bullock, a major part of this new shift will be for MBA programs to use part-time and online learning models to open their offerings to a broader range of students. These efforts will help MBA programs get past the paradigm in which they are reserved for “the elite, accessible only to those of a certain academic or professional pedigree who could dedicate themselves to a traditional, full-time program.” To this end, MBA programs need to “recognize the different learning styles, needs, and experiences” of those who can bring value to the business community.

BCIT School of Business Receives Initial ACBSP Accreditation

Source: BCIT News Release via Academica

The British Columbia Institute of Technology’s School of Business has been granted initial accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). The accreditation includes a number of notes and conditions that must be met, and ACBSP will review BCIT programs every two years to ensure that the terms of the accreditation are being followed. “The accreditation process … served to validate BCIT’s unique model that focuses on industry alignment as a means of delivering high quality professional business education,” said Robin Hemmingsen, Dean of the BCIT School of Business. The accreditation applies to more than 15 programs offered at BCIT [CIEC Academic Member].

Premier Kathleen Wynne Announces Mission to India

Source: Ontario News Release

Premier Kathleen Wynne will lead a mission to India in early 2016 to foster more opportunities for trade and investment and promote Ontario’s expertise in sustainable development.

A main component of the trip will be a business delegation that will visit New Delhi and Mumbai — India’s governing and economic centres — as well as Hyderabad and Chandigarh. Premier Wynne will meet with government and industry decision-makers to discuss how Ontario’s expertise makes the province an attractive partner as India works toward achieving its sustainable development goals. She will also highlight the province’s position as the North American leader in attracting foreign capital investment. The mission is expected to result in several new agreements that will create jobs and boost the provincial economy. 

As part of the trip, Premier Wynne will also meet with cultural leaders to reinforce Ontario’s commitment to fostering stronger ties with India.

Providing more opportunities for Ontario companies to compete internationally is part of the government’s economic plan. The four-part plan is building Ontario up by investing in people’s talents and skills, making the largest investment in public infrastructure in the province’s history, creating a dynamic, innovative environment where business thrives, and building a secure retirement savings plan.

RBC President says Canadian Businesses Must Help Expand Co-op Education

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

RBC President David McKay has contributed an op-ed to the Globe and Mail highlighting the benefits of co-op education for students and employers. McKay says that co-op education “has become a proven way to prepare students for a world in which change is accelerating and challenges are growing ever more complex.” He says that co-op exposes students to new ideas, experiences, and ways of working, while helping to create a critical bridge between employers and PSE. McKay argues that Canada is falling behind other nations when it comes to blending work and learning. He calls on employers to take the lead in stressing the importance of co-op education and increasing the depth and quality of placements.

Indo-Canadian MoUs to Help Skilling in Apparel Sector

Source: Fibre2Fashion

India and Canada have signed two different memorandum of understanding (MoUs) for skill development in the apparel sector, the apex apparel exporters body, Apparel Export Promotion Council, (AEPC) said in a statement today.

The agreements were signed during the recent visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Canada.

Dr A Sakthivel, Chairman Apparel, Made-Ups & Home Furnishing Sector Skill Council (AMH SSC) signed an MoU with Bruce Wilson, President, Fanshawe College, Canada for transfer of expertise in the field of Training of Trainers and other fields.

The MoU envisages greater cooperation between the Canadian partner and AMH SSC, whereby, Fanshawe College will share their expertise in the training of trainers and other fields in the skilling process.

This will result in availability of larger number of Quality Master Trainers which in turn, will ensure quality training in skilling in the apparel sector.

Dr Sakthivel also signed another MoU with Husain F Neemuchwala of the Canada India Education Council (CIEC) to access expertise in the field of skilling in the apparel sector.

Canada Announces Funding for National Accelerator Initiatives

Source: SFU News Release via Academica

Canada has announced that Ryerson University, [CIEC Academic Member] Simon Fraser University, and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) will receive up to $10.7 M over the next 5 years in support of the Zones of Incubation and Innovation initiative. The funding will be distributed through the Canada Accelerator and Incubator Program (CAIP). The joint initiative between the 3 institutions is intended to provide universities and community-based entrepreneurs involved with digital technology start-ups access to facilities, business development resources, and mentoring. “The Zones of Incubation and Innovation Network will play an important role in SFU’s growing innovation agenda. We are pleased to be partnering with Ryerson University and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology on this initiative and grateful for the financial support provided by the Government of Canada through the CAIP program,” said SFU VP Research Joy Johnson. Canada also announced $2.7 M in funding for The Next 36, a national accelerator and incubator program that includes 9 Canadian universities as academic partners.

PSE Should Exercise Caution When Importing Ideas From The Business World

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education via Academica

In an article for The Chronicle of Higher Education, Mark Burstein, President of Wisconsin’s Lawrence University, examines the often unanticipated drawbacks of importing ideas from the business world to PSE. Burstein says that while business tools and strategies can help colleges and universities address a number of key challenges, it is critical to consider whether or not they truly improve student learning. He argues that campus leaders must be wary that business philosophies and concepts do not undermine institutions’ educational missions. Burstein says that in the US, many institutions have been forced to rely on business advice due to government regulation; this has contributed, he argues, to a growing compensation gap between front-line staff members and senior administration, with a negative impact on the academic community. Burstein also warns against treating students like customers. He says that the service industry’s mission is to delight its customers, but that PSE institutions should be prepared to challenge students in ways that are not always delightful. He further warns that some business models risk disenfranchising members of campus communities, undermining the learning environment. “If business concepts dominate our thinking about the future, we will have lost our way,” he concludes.

University Degrees Pay Off Over the Long Term

Source: Financial Post via Academica

The Financial Post has crunched the numbers to determine whether students would earn more by paying tuition for 4 years or by investing the same amount of money in a retirement fund. The study assumes that the average cost of a degree is $68,933; assuming a 5% return annually over 45 years, that amount would be worth $619,364 as an investment, and would offer students the chance to put in 4 years more time in the labour force. Based on an average income of $30,817 for a high school graduate, the hypothetical individual could, were they able to bank 100% of their after-tax earnings, make another $800,000 by investing their money at a 5% return, for a total of $1.4 M in 45 years’ time. That’s the same amount that the Council of Ontario Universities suggests a university graduate will make in excess of an individual with a high school diploma. However, this figure does not take into account increases in earnings due to inflation, which could lead to the university graduate earning an excess of closer to $2.1 M; wisely invested, that could make the value of a degree as much as $3.8 M greater than that of a high school diploma. A university graduate, the article says, is “more likely to be more financially independent during their working and retirement years,” and would have more options available to them.

Governor General to Undertake State Visit to the Republic of India

Source: Consulate General of Canada News Release | February 19, 2014

OTTAWA—At the request of the Right Honourable Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada, Their Excellencies the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, and Mrs. Sharon Johnston will conduct a State visit to the Republic of India, from February 22 to March 2, 2014.

“Sharon and I are looking forward to our State visit to India, which will be centred on the themes of innovation, entrepreneurship and education, with a special focus on the contributions of women and girls,” His Excellency said. “This visit is a reflection of the importance Canada attaches to its relationship with India. Both of our countries are committed to strengthening our partnership and co-operation. The Canada-India economic relationship is strong and holds tremendous potential for broader and expanded collaboration. During our time spent in New Delhi, Bangalore and Mumbai, we will meet with government officials, representatives from the business and education sectors, and those from non-governmental organizations with the aim of advancing our economic, academic and cultural ties with our Indian counterparts.”

His Excellency will be joined by parliamentarians and an accompanying delegation of Canadians who will enhance business, academic, cultural and people-to-people ties with their Indian counterparts. These exchanges will further develop the wide-ranging and multi-faceted relationship with India, a major economic player and priority market for Canada, and will provide greater impetus to bilateral initiatives in various sectors, particularly in strategies promoting innovation, entrepreneurship and education.

State Visit to India: New Delhi (February 22 to 25)

In the capital city of New Delhi, Their Excellencies will be officially welcomed by the President and Prime Minister of India during a welcoming ceremony at Rashtrapati Bhawan, the Presidential Palace. To underscore the important friendship and co-operation between both countries, and on behalf of the people of Canada, Their Excellencies will present an inuksuk to the people of India.

During this visit, His Excellency will meet with Canadian and Indian business leaders to discuss our nations’ economic relationship at a business meeting with the Chambers of Commerce hosted by the Government of India, and at the Canada-India CEO Forum. The Governor General will also discuss the role of innovation in addressing global health challenges during the Grand Challenges Global Health Innovation Roundtable, organized by Grand Challenges Canada.

Her Excellency will discuss the opportunities and challenges faced by women researchers supported by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and also by women entrepreneurs. She will also visit non-governmental organizations (NGOs) providing education to underprivileged children, and free services to children diagnosed with cancer.

State Visit to India – Bangalore (February 26 and 27)

In Bangalore, Their Excellencies will meet with the Governor of Karnataka. They will visit the All India Coordinated Small Millets Improvement Project—created by IDRC and the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) at the University of Agricultural Sciences, in Bangalore—as well as inaugurate the new consulate general, which will oversee Canada’s expanded presence in South India.

His Excellency will discuss the importance of skills development in further building connections between Canadian and Indian institutions during a panel discussion, and participate in a Canada-India discussion on innovation hosted by the Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada and the National Innovation Council of India.

Her Excellency will visit NGOs dedicated to helping children with HIV and to supporting Indian women entrepreneurs.

State Visit to India – Mumbai (February 27 to March 2)

While in Mumbai, Their Excellencies will meet with the Governor of Maharashtra, and pay their respects at a memorial to the 32 victims of the November 2008 terrorist attack on the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel. During a visit to Dharavi, one of the largest slums in Asia, Their Excellencies will see, first-hand, examples of India’s deep-seated entrepreneurship and various micro-businesses. They will also discuss the future of audiovisual co-production between Canada and India at Film City, one of the largest shooting locations in India.

In addition, His Excellency will have the opportunity to open the stock market at the Bombay Stock Exchange, and witness the inauguration of BIL-Ryerson DMZ India Ltd., an incubation centre for entrepreneurs supported in partnership with the Bombay Stock Exchange Institute, Ryerson University and Simon Fraser University. He will also address innovators and entrepreneurs at the Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay; business leaders at the Indo-Canadian Business Chamber Annual Convention; and the heads of various educational institutions to exchange views on skills development and the future of education in India.

Her Excellency will meet with women leaders from the private and public sectors, civil society and academia on the status of women in India, and visit a strategic philanthropy NGO co-founded and co-managed by an Indo-Canadian. She will also meet with social workers and volunteers who prevent second-generation trafficking among the children of sex workers in Asia’s largest and oldest red-light district.

Visits abroad by a governor general play an important role in Canada’s relations with other countries. They are highly valuable as they help broaden bilateral relations and exchanges among peoples.

Members of the public can follow the Governor General’s State visit to the Republic of India online at www.gg.ca, where speeches, photos and videos will be posted.

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The detailed itinerary and a list of accompanying delegates will be published at a later date.

Media information:

Marie-Ève Létourneau                                               Rideau Hall Press Office 613-998-0287 marie-eve.letourneau@gg.ca

uWaterloo’s Velocity startups raise more than $100 million

Source: uWaterloo News Release | January 29, 2014

Start-ups in the the University of Waterloo’s Velocity entrepreneurship incubator program have raised more than $100 million in funding in the 5 years since the initiative was launched. The investments received include funding from venture capitalists, angel investors, government programs, grants from the Velocity Fund, and crowd-funding website Kickstarter. Velocity’s Pebble, the makers of a “smart watch,” raised $10 million on Kickstarter in 2012. Velocity’s milestone announcement follows the launch of the provincial government’s new Northleaf Venture Catalyst Fund, which aims to drive private-sector investment in Canadian companies in the early to middle stages of growth.

TCS Insights: Students with small businesses participating in the uWaterloo Velocity program are being provided with opportunities to reach their entrepreneurial goals through the aid of a variety of sources.  Both the university and the Ontario provincial government continue to display a commitment to developing entrepreneurs.

How long-term unemployment is affecting the job search

Source: The Globe And Mail

What is the only thing worse than unemployment? Long-term unemployment, apparently. If you lose your job, there are a bunch of hardships you are inevitably going to endure until you find a new one. If you do not find a new one in a hurry, you may face the additional hardship of not finding one for an increasingly long period of time. Employers, it seems, view people who have not held a job with an eye that increases in wariness in proportion to their joblessness.

The insights come from an upcoming paper by Swedish economists Stefan Eriksson and Dan-Olof Rooth, which is to be published in the American Economic Review and was quoted in a blog in this week’s Wall Street Journal. The economists used Swedish data on calls returned to job applicants, sorting job seekers by duration of unemployment. What they found was that being unemployed for a short period of time made no difference at all to job seekers’ prospects, but that being unemployed for longer did.

Actually, it made a difference for workers who were applying for jobs that did not require a college degree, who saw their returned calls decline by 20 per cent. Workers who were applying for jobs that did need more education did not see the same decline in response, although it is difficult to know why. The old rule of thumb is that for every $10,000 you earn, it takes a month to find a new job so perhaps those seeking more educated, higher-wage employees realize they are interviewing people in a more selective, slower job market. Perhaps, too, there is a realization that higher wage workers may have left their last positions with a hefty goodbye package and hence may not be in as much of a hurry as those with more modest skills.

At any rate, the study says little about who actually got hired, just who got in the door. As well, although the Swedish economists believe their research has implications for the U.S. as well as Sweden, it is not hard to believe that the latter is a kinder gentler place than the former, which has gone through a brutal recession. Even in (relatively) kinder and gentler Canada, it seems likely that those with a long period of unemployment on their resume are going to get a harder look than those who are fresh from previous employment, whatever their level of education.

The good news, if there is any good news in the context of unemployment, is that over this business cycle, long-term unemployment has been a considerably less severe problem in Canada than it is in the United States. According to Statistics Canada, as of June, 2013 (the last month for which Canadian data is available), the average duration of unemployment in Canada was 18.3 weeks. In contrast, the average duration of unemployment in the U.S. was 35.6 weeks. In the Canadian case, the figure has not changed too much from before the recession. In June, 2008, the average duration of unemployment in Canada was 13.9 weeks, suggesting a lengthening of about 50 per cent. In the U.S., the length of unemployment has effectively doubled. As of June, approximately 19.9 per cent of the unemployed in Canada were without work for 27 weeks or more, while in the U.S., the figure was 36.7 per cent.

The duration of unemployment is a key indicator to watch. There has been much ado about the improvement in the U.S. labour market, and it is certainly true that the unemployment rate has dipped sharply. As of July, the U.S. unemployment rate was 7.4 per cent, compared to 10 per cent at its peak in October, 2009. Still, over that same period, the duration of unemployment has increased by about 9 weeks, and is coming down very slowly (by about 4 weeks over the past two years). Until this indicator shows an improvement, it will be hard to say that the malaise in the U.S. labour market has lifted, and with it much of the concerns about the global economy that are keeping everybody’s interest rates, including Canada’s, on hold.