India: 8 Courses That Lead To High-Paying Jobs

Source: Study International

Students who take Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) courses look set to rake in the money once they enter the job market. And it seems to be a choice that will ultimately pay off, given the lucrative remuneration packages companies are giving to graduates from these fields. “Generally, STEM courses stand as one of the highest-paying jobs worldwide,” international education consultancy The Chopras managing director Natasha Chopra said.

For the complete list, visit Study International.

94% of ON University Grads Find Jobs within 2 Years of Graduation

Source: Council of Ontario Universities via Academica

More than nine out of ten university graduates from Ontario find well-paying jobs within two years of graduating, according to a new study conducted for the province’s Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development. The survey-based study showed that university graduates in full-time jobs earn an average salary of almost $42K six months after graduation, and an average of more than $49K after two years. The report also found that employment rates and earnings for university undergraduates were higher than they were for any other level of education. A large majority of recent graduates in full-time jobs also said that their work was related to the skills they developed in their program of study. “In a complex and ever-changing world, Ontario’s universities are helping to build a brighter future for graduates, their families and communities, and the province,” said Council of Ontario Universities President David Lindsay.

How India is Climbing International University Rankings

Source: University World News via Academica

Institutions from around the world can learn much from the progress that China and India are making in global university rankings, writes Anand Kulkarni for University World News. The author highlights how both countries have fared well in recent years, noting for example that India has risen to eighth in the world for the number of students it graduates in science and engineering. Kulkarni warns, however, that graduating more students in a particular area “does not necessarily say much about quality, the ability of graduates to find meaningful jobs or research capability, among other things.” This is part of the reason, Kulkarni writes, that China has advanced in world university rankings at a better pace than India. The author attributes this success to China’s more consistent distribution of institutions among the different tiers of rankings, while India’s tendency to have a “best and the rest” system, with only a few elite institutions, continues to hold back the country’s overall performance.

Canada Eyes New Visa to Attract Talented Workers

Source: Bloomberg

Canada is considering introducing a “global talent visa” to attract high-skill workers, though the country remains divided on expanding immigration amid pockets of high regional unemployment, Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains says.

For the full article, visit Bloomberg.

How Canada Will Produce the 150,000 Tech Experts It Needs

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

Canada will require a historic effort to supply the number of tech experts it needs to be a world economic leader in the 21st-century, write Stephen Lake and Sarah Prevette for the Globe and Mail. The authors outline four strategies that Canada can use to produce an additional 150,000 tech experts in the near future, which include making coding part of the education curriculum as early as elementary school; expanding postsecondary co-op programs; fighting for gender equality and parity, particularly in the STEM disciplines; and encouraging immigration.

PSE Leads to Income Increases, uOttawa Study Finds

Source: Universities Canada via Academica

New research from the University of Ottawa on Canadian PSE graduate earnings between 2005 and 2013 has found that graduates from nearly all disciplines see salary increases over time. Graduates of bachelor’s programs saw a 66% increase in their average yearly earnings 8 years after graduation, while college diploma graduates saw a 59% increase. While graduates in STEM fields and business generally had higher salaries and greater earning growth, those from other disciplines, “including the oft-maligned Humanities and Social Sciences bachelor’s graduates,” also performed well. The report states that “very few graduates had truly barista-level earnings even to start, and they increasingly moved even further from that level as they gained labour market experience.”

PEI to Include International Students in Mentorship Program

Source: CBC via Academica

PEI has announced that it will expand its mentorship program for recent graduates to include applications from international students, giving them better access to the PEI workforce. Skills PEI contributes up to 50% of wage costs for the first year of employment for postsecondary graduates who are enrolled in the mentorship program. “Hopefully they join the companies, help the company grow, and they will stay here on Prince Edward Island,” said Richard Brown, PEI’s Minister of Workforce and Advanced Learning, “the company grows, the economy grows, it’s good for Prince Edward Island.”

Emerging Business Opportunities with India

March 15, 2016 – India is emerging. Set to be the most populous country by 2025, India presents a generational businesses opportunity. From R&D, to infrastructure development, and IT, the world’s largest democracy is growing at a rapid pace.

International Experience Becoming Essential for MBA Programs

Source: Canadian Business via Academica

International business experience is quickly becoming an essential part of an MBA graduate’s CV, reports Canadian Business. As a result, more of the country’s MBA programs are adding international exchanges and fellowships to their curricula. Some major business schools that have recently added these components are the Sobey School of Business at Saint Mary’s University, the Rotman School of Business at the University of Toronto, and the Asper School of Business at the University of Manitoba.

Fleming College approved as Registered Education Provider by Project Management Institute

Fleming College approved as Registered Education Provider by Project Management Institute

Source: Fleming College

[CIEC Academic Member] Fleming College has been approved as a Registered Education Provider (REP) by the world’s largest project management member association, the Project Management Institute (PMI).

The designation ensures that Fleming has met PMI’s rigorous quality criteria for course content, instructor qualification, and instructional design. REPs are organizations that have been approved by PMI to help project managers achieve and maintain the Project Management Professional (PMP) ® , Program Management Professional (PgMP)® and other PMI professional credentials. The college now joins more than 1,500 REPs in more than 80 countries.

“This brings us closer to our goal of having Fleming College’s School of Business become the Project Management hub for Eastern Ontario,” said Raymond Yip Choy, Coordinator of Fleming’s Project Management program.

“We have worked to create strong links with PMI. The program has high student and employer satisfaction rates as well as newly-established community links through the completion of successful applied projects and internships. We look forward to further enhancing the reputation of this program and expanding our opportunities to provide certification in this growing career field.”

In addition to the designation, Fleming hosts the PMI Group Examination three times a year. This provides an opportunity for students and industry members to write the professional certifications at the college.

The Project Management program is a post-graduate certificate program offered at the Sutherland Campus. Through classroom sessions and applied project experience, students learn and practice how to initiate, execute and close projects incorporating scheduling tools, budgeting principles, human resource management, risk management and quality management. Communication and leadership skills are also developed and honed throughout the program. For more information on the program, visit: flemingcollege.ca/programs/project-management.

About Project Management Institute (PMI)
Project Management Institute is the world’s leading not-for-profit professional membership association for the project, program and portfolio management profession. Founded in 1969, PMI delivers value for more than 2.9 million professionals working in nearly every country in the world through global advocacy, collaboration, education and research. PMI advances careers, improves organizational success and further matures the profession of project management through its globally recognized standards, certifications, resources, tools academic research, publications, professional development courses, and networking opportunities. As part of the PMI family, Human Systems International (HSI) provides organizational assessment and benchmarking services to leading businesses and government, while ProjectManagement.com and ProjectsAtWork.com create online global communities that deliver more resources, better tools, larger networks and broader perspectives. Visit us at www.PMI.orgwww.facebook.com/PMInstitute and on Twitter @PMInstitute.

About Fleming College
Located in the heart of Central Ontario, Fleming College has campus locations in Peterborough, Lindsay, Cobourg and Haliburton. Named for famous Canadian inventor and engineer Sir Sandford Fleming, the college features more than 100 full-time programs in Arts and Heritage, Business, Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, General Arts and Science, Health and Wellness, Justice and Community Development, Skilled Trades and Technology, and Continuing Education. Fleming College has 5,900 full-time and 10,000 part-time students, and more than 68,000 alumni.

Edu-Canada Canadian MBA Showcase Tour 2015

Source: Indo-Canadian Business Chamber via High Commission of Canada

Following on the success of the inaugural Edu-Canada Canadian MBA Showcase Tour in September 2014, the High Commission of Canada in India is pleased to announce the 2015 Edu-Canada Canadian MBA Showcase Tour. Once again co-organized with the Indo-Canadian Business Chamber (ICBC), this second iteration will visit Bengaluru, Chennai, Mumbai, Delhi, and Chandigarh. Canadian universities offering MBA programs to international students will be highlighting their course offerings, scholarships, student experience, accessibility, affordability, and career paths in an all-Canada context.

Minister Fast Encourages Ontario Companies to “Go Global” in India

Source: Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada

International Trade Minister Ed Fast today hosted a Go Global workshop in Brampton, Ontario, to highlight tools available to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that want to take advantage of new export opportunities in India.

India is a priority market under the Government of Canada’s Global Markets Action Plan. During the workshop’s panel discussions, Minister Fast encouraged companies to leverage the many federal government tools available to support Canadian companies looking to export to India. The Minister also noted that Canada continues to work closely with the government of India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi to create new opportunities for businesses.  

Minister Fast announced that the Invest Canada – Community Initiatives (ICCI) and the Global Opportunities for Associations (GOA) programs are now accepting applications for an additional round of funding. The ICCI program provides support to Canadian communities seeking to improve their capacity to attract, retain and expand foreign direct investment. The GOA program provides funding to national associations in support of new or expanded international business development activities in strategic markets and sectors.

International Students at Niagara Claim They Were Denied Work Permits for Taking Online Courses

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

More than 50 Niagara College students have sought legal representation after they were denied Canadian work permits, allegedly because they took online courses as part of their program. Ravi Jain, an immigration lawyer representing the students, says 30 of his clients have already received rejections on their work permit applications since graduating. While international students have received work permits in the past after completing Niagara’s programs, this year they say they are being refused because Citizenship and Immigration Canada considers online courses to be “distance learning.”

Engineers Canada Releases Report on Labour Market

Source: Engineers Canada Release via Academica

Engineers Canada has released a new report outlining projections of the expected supply and demand of engineers in Canada through to 2025. The report, Engineering Labour Market in Canada: Projections to 2025, provides provincial-level breakdowns of the number of engineers currently working, the average age of engineers in different fields, and the projected need for engineers to fill vacated positions. The report suggests that recent engineering graduates will not be able to replace retiring senior engineers; inter-provincial mobility of senior engineers and the immigration of international engineers will be necessary to fill these positions. The report also recommends that traditionally underrepresented groups such as women and Aboriginal peoples will be needed in the engineering workforce.

German Foundation Compares Study-to-Work Transition For International Students in Four Countries

Source: SVR Report via Academica

A new study by the Expert Council of German Foundations on Integration and Migration (SVR) maps supports for the study-to-work transition for international students at 238 PSE institutions in Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden. The report indicates that large businesses are actively involved in hiring international students at 40% of Canadian institutions, and that small businesses are better represented among active recruiters on Canadian campuses than in the other countries. However, international students still often encounter a “patchwork” of resources, and more coordination is necessary. The study further recommends more information sharing, the development of shared goals, and greater involvement from municipalities.

RBC President says Canadian Businesses Must Help Expand Co-op Education

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

RBC President David McKay has contributed an op-ed to the Globe and Mail highlighting the benefits of co-op education for students and employers. McKay says that co-op education “has become a proven way to prepare students for a world in which change is accelerating and challenges are growing ever more complex.” He says that co-op exposes students to new ideas, experiences, and ways of working, while helping to create a critical bridge between employers and PSE. McKay argues that Canada is falling behind other nations when it comes to blending work and learning. He calls on employers to take the lead in stressing the importance of co-op education and increasing the depth and quality of placements.

PSE’s Reaction to Budget Largely Positive

Source: CICan News Release via Academica

Reactions to Canada’s budget from the PSE sector were mainly positive, with some exceptions. Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan) applauded federal investment in research infrastructure and in programs designed to foster close relationships between business and industry associations and PSE partners. Polytechnics Canada, meanwhile, welcomed the expanded adoption of the Blue Seal Certification program and Canada’s investment in a one-stop national labour market information portal. Universities Canada (formerly the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada) said that Canada’s $1.33 M investment in research infrastructure will yield significant benefits for Canadian researchers. Jonathan Champagne, Executive Director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations (CASA) said that his organization was “extremely pleased” with the budget’s commitments to student aid. However, the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) said that by making loans more accessible, the budget will lead to greater student debt.

Canada’s Budget Focuses on Alignment Between PSE, Labour Market Need

Source: Budget 2015 via Academica

Canada unveiled its new federal budget on Tuesday. The budget’s highlights include $1.33 B over 6 years, beginning in 2017–18, for the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI); $105 M over 5 years, beginning in 2015–16, for CANARIE; an additional $46 M per year, beginning in 2016–17, of targeted funding for Canada’s granting councils; $119.2 M over 2 years, beginning in 2015–16, for the National Research Council’s industry-partnered research and development activities; a one-time investment of $65 M for business and industry associations to work with PSE institutions to align curricula with employer needs; and $56.4 M over 4 years, beginning in 2016–17, to Mitacs for graduate-level industrial research and development internships. The budget will also reduce the expected parental contribution and remove the penalty for in-study student income for the Canada Student Loans assessment process. Furthermore, the budget provides for the expanded adoption of the Blue Seal Certification program and the creation of a one-stop national labour market information portal.

Panel Recommends Ways to Improve Processes for Integrating Immigrants Into Workforce

Source: Panel on Employment Challenges of New Canadians Report via Academica

The federal Panel on Employment Challenges of New Canadians has released a report that explores ways to improve the process of getting internationally trained immigrants into the Canadian labour force. The report looks at current barriers and makes a number of recommendations such as developing pan-Canadian standards for occupations so that people can assess their credentials before moving to Canada, and developing a broader strategy for alternative careers with more regulator involvement. The federal government also announced support for 2 new initiatives, one led by the Medical Council of Canada and the other by Engineers Canada, which will more quickly and efficiently evaluate the credentials of internationally trained doctors and lawyers. Several Canadian universities have launched initiatives to help internationally trained doctors, lawyers, and midwives.

Colleges Help Students Meet Industry Demand for Soft Skills

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

An article in the Globe and Mail looks at how Canadian colleges are working to overcome a gap between the demands of employers and the skills of recent graduates. The article notes that recent US-based surveys have found that while 75% of education providers said that graduates were adequately prepared for entry-level positions in their field, only 42% of employers and 45% of youth felt the same way. 49% of employers felt that grads had adequate written communication skills, in contrast to 63% of education providers. In response, some colleges are working to enhance their soft skills offerings, providing instruction on communication, teamwork, and problem-solving, sometimes in collaboration with employers. The British Columbia Institute of Technology [CIEC Academic Member], for example, requires that students complete a hands-on consulting project for an industry client in order to graduate. BCIT has also collaborated with SAP Canada to develop a high-school course that has students working on real-world projects and learning about teamwork and job readiness. “I firmly believe you have to simulate what is done in industry if you are going to call yourself industry-ready,” said Robin Hemmingsen, Dean of BCIT’s business school.

Canada Invests in Programs to Support Internationally Educated Health Professionals

Source: Canada News Release via Academica

The federal government has announced that Canada will invest nearly $8.4 M to support initiatives that bring internationally educated health professionals (IEHPs) into the workforce. Approximately 4.6 M Canadians do not have a regular family doctor, while there are 10,000 newcomers to Canada who are health-related professionals. The funding will support 3 initiatives that will be implemented through a collaboration between HealthForceOntario and the University of Toronto. Canada has also provided $150,000 to the Medical Council of Canada for a project intended to help international medical graduates prepare to enter the workforce. In a statement, Canadian Medical Association (CMA) President Chris Simpson welcomed the announcement, but warned that “actively recruiting from developing countries is not an acceptable solution to our physician shortage.” Simpson noted that “it has been almost 4 decades since the completion of a national study of physician requirements,” and said that Canada must become more self-sufficient in its efforts to educate and train physicians. Academica Group recently worked with multiple collaborators on a report that evaluated bridging programs for IEHPs.

Initiatives Aim to Inspire Girls to Pursue Careers in Sciences

Source: Winnipeg Free Press via Academica

An article published by the Canadian Press highlights efforts being made by Canadian universities to attract girls to the sciences and engineering. uToronto and UBC have recently reported increases in the number of women entering their engineering programs, but there is still a significant gender gap in many STEM-related professions. According to Engineers Canada, just 18.3% of undergraduate engineering degrees awarded in 2013 went to women. PSE institutions are working with other organizations to fix that by engaging girls before they reach high school. Research has shown that many girls lose their interest in the sciences by  the time they enter ninth grade, meaning that many don’t take the advanced courses they need to enter STEM programs at university. Ottawa-based charity Actua works with 33 Canadian institutions to offer girls-only science classes in the hopes of encouraging interest and inspiring confidence in participants, as well as getting parents to encourage young girls’ aspirations for STEM-related careers.

New Tuition Incentive in NS Aims to Recruit Doctors to Rural Areas

Source: NS News Release via Academica | January 9, 2015

The Nova Scotia government has announced a new initiative designed to recruit doctors to underserved communities in the province. The incentive program offers to repay the cost of tuition for medical school, up to $120,000, in exchange for a 5-year commitment to practise in an underserved community. The program is open to 25 medical students in residency, or doctors from outside the province who have practised for less than 7 years, over the next 4 years. The program is the main recommendation of the Physician Recruitment and Retention Action Team, an expert panel set up to identify ways to recruit and retain doctors. “Not only will this program represent a first step in assisting new and recent graduates repay student debt, it will have a positive impact on the health of Nova Scotians by placing physicians in underserviced areas of the province,” said Russell Christie, President of Dalhousie Medical Students Society.

BC Releases Labour Market Forecast for Next 7 Years

Source: BC News Release via Academica | January 7, 2015

British Columbia’s government has released a new report that predicts that there will be nearly 1 M job openings between now and 2022. Two-thirds of those openings are expected to be due to the retirement of baby boomers, with the remaining third attributed to economic growth. Four-fifths of the positions will require some form of PSE, and 44% of the jobs will be in skilled trades and technical occupations. The province also suggests that liquid natural gas development could add an additional 100,000 openings to the forecasted figure. The 3 occupation groups with the most expected openings over the next 7 years are projected to be sales and service occupations; business, finance, and administration occupations; and trades, transport, and equipment operators and related occupations. Most openings will occur in the Lower Mainland, while the Northeast, the North Coast and Nechako, and the Lower Mainland/Southwest regions are expected to see growth in demand for workers at rates above the provincial average of 1.2%.

Canadian Chamber of Commerce Releases Report on Getting Graduates into Labour Market

Source: CCC Report via Academica | Oct 16, 2014

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC) has released a new report entitled “A Battle We Can’t Afford to Lose: Getting Young Canadians from Education to Employment.” The report considers 3 factors that it says affect young Canadians’ ability to join the labour market: labour market information, career decision-making, and work-integrated learning. The CCC calls on governments, education providers, and businesses to collaborate in order to mitigate skills mismatching and to help students transition from education to employment, and identifies the development of basic skills—including literacy, numeracy, technological literacy, and problem solving—as a priority issue. The report emphasizes the value of “soft” skills, including relationship-building skills and communication skills, as being particularly important for entry-level positions; moreover, it highlights the importance of strong labour market information to help guide career decision-making, curricula design, recruitment strategies, and education policy-making. The CCC also emphasizes the value of work-integrated learning, and suggests that it is underused by university students.

Immigrant Employment Projects Get Funding from MB, Canada

Source: Canada News Release via Academica | Aug 21, 2014

The governments of Canada and Manitoba have teamed up to provide $1.1 M to Employment Solutions for Immigrants for 2 projects designed to help immigrant youth reduce barriers to employment. The first project will help 120 immigrant youth gain life and employability skills through workshops and work placements. The second project will provide 20 immigrant youth with job placements in high-demand fields such as manufacturing, transportation, and health care services. “These programs offer newcomer youth with a much better chance of entering the Canadian workplace, not only with enhanced preparation and increased confidence, but also in a field and at a job level that is on a par with their existing skills and experience. In short, these programs set up newcomer youth for career success,” said Executive Director of Employment Solutions for Immigrants Loraine M Nyokong.

Dalhousie’s Pilot Program Helps Put International Students in NS Workplaces

Dalhousie’s Pilot Program Helps Put International Students in NS Workplaces

Source: Chronicle Herald via Academica | July 23, 2014

Dalhousie University has launched a pilot program to help international students establish themselves in Nova Scotia’s workplaces. “We’ve noticed that many [international students] are having to go back to their home countries to do their work terms in order to stay on track… and graduate with our [commerce] program,” said Anna Cranston, Director of Management Career Services at Dal. The new workplace experience program helps international students establish contacts and build their confidence in the Canadian workplace. Students and employers alike learn more about cultural differences as well as the challenges faced by international students looking to join the Canadian workforce. “It’s only a small way but if there’s a way that we can find to make international students feel more comfortable in the workplace and out getting jobs, then maybe there’s a chance that they’re going to stay when they graduate,” said Robert Everist, Chief Operating Officer for Cox & Palmer, a firm that hosted a student this summer. NS recently created pathways to encourage international students to stay in the province post-graduation.

Canada Adds 10 Occupations to “Priority” Immigration Program

Source: Canada News Release via Academica | July 22, 2014

The federal government has announced the addition of 10 occupations to its “priority assessment program” that fast-tracks the recognition and processing of foreign credentials for in-demand occupations. The 10 new occupations increase the program’s list to 24, and include geoscientists, carpenters, electricians, heavy duty equipment technicians, heavy equipment operators, welders, audiologists and speech language pathologists, midwives, psychologists, and lawyers. Healthcare and trades have been highlighted as experiencing skills shortages in certain areas across Canada. Skilled immigrants have often complained that they must take on low-skilled employment while waiting for paperwork to be processed. “We recognize that skilled newcomers help fill shortages in key occupations and make an important contribution to Canada’s economy. That is why we are speeding up foreign credential recognition for 10 more occupations … This means that even more new Canadians can put their skills to work sooner across Canada,” said Jason Kenney, Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Multiculturalism.

Own Business Now Big Lure for Fresh MBA Graduates: Survey

Source: Times of India | March 17, 2014

NEW DELHI: Fresh B-school graduates are increasingly shunning the security of a steady job and striking out on their own. A worldwide survey of B-school alumni reveals that 45% of those who graduated between 2010 and 2013 preferred self-employment — that’s almost double the proportion of their seniors who opted to pursue their own dreams in the 2000-2009 period. The survey, conducted among nearly 21,000 alumni representing 132 institutions from 129 countries, covered batches from 1959 to 2013. It showed a steadily growing preference for self-employment among fresh graduates. In the 2000-2009 period, 25% of graduates opted for it while in the decade before that the figure was 14%. 

The survey was carried out by Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), which conducts the GMAT exam for admission to more than 6,000 graduate management programmes worldwide. 

The US remains the most preferred job location for alumni from B-schools worldwide with Chinese and Indians taking the lead. As many as 38% of Chinese graduates preferred to work in the US, while 23% of Indian B-schoolers landed up in that country. The survey revealed that a quarter of B-school alumni across the world don’t work within their own country. While almost all B-school graduates from the US (97%) are likely to work in their own country, a majority of the Chinese are likely to work overseas (52%). 

Canada leads the table for annual median salary at entry level with US$ 75,000, but it is the US which pays the highest mid, senior and executive-level salaries. The pay package for B-school alumni in India was among the lowest in the 18 countries listed in the survey. 

“This is a robust survey results in this debut effort from direct collaboration with 132 business schools in 29 countries. A fascinating highlight of this year’s alumni survey is the wide reach of salary data. Seeing earnings data by job level for graduates of business school who work in India is helpful information to consider in one’s career planning and expectations,” said Michelle Sparkman Renz, director, research communications, GMAC. 

As for B-school education, 77% of the alumni said it was financially rewarding. Old students also ensured that they keep in touch with the alma mater be it for mentoring scholars or for recruitment. Nearly 34% of recent alumni have kept contact with the faculty, while 28% attended alumni events. Around 43% of old students visited their alumni website, and an even higher 45% followed their B-school on social media. 

The survey also revealed a shifting preference in functional domain. Since 2000, finance and accounting has been the dominating sector, overtaking the tradition general management. Emerging trends show that marketing, sales and consulting are the new areas of aspiration.

TCS Insights: Business students are currently more inclined to start their own businesses around the world than in years prior. International experience will play a critical role to those looking to succeed in this pursuit. Those aspiring to do business in North America after they graduate should attempt to spend time studying there to develop a knowledge of the culture along with their network of contacts.

George Brown, Ryerson Receive $1.5 Million For Job Training

Source: Ontario News Release via Academica | March 18, 2014

The Ontario government has committed $1.5 million towards partnerships with George Brown College and Ryerson University that are aimed towards training graduates for jobs that lack skilled employees. George Brown will receive $750,000 to train 92 unemployed and under-employed youth for commercial baking and metalwork jobs. Ryerson will get $800,000 to create 120 jobs in the high-tech sector for graduates in the social sciences and humanities; examples of possible initiatives include offering liberal arts graduates short-term training and job placements that would provide them with the types of skills already acquired by science students. Both projects are part of the government’s $25-million Youth Skills Connections program, which aims to bring employers, PSE institutions, government and young people together to tackle the so-called skills-gap issue.

TCS Insights: The Ontario government hopes to fill the void created by low numbers of skilled employees in certain industries by training unemployed and underemployed individuals for available positions. The province is displaying a commitment to providing job opportunities for all students attending post-secondary institutions.