Synergy 2016: Call for Proposals

In keeping with past ‘Synergy’ events (organized since 2007) which have tended to attract thought leaders from leading Colleges and Universities, we invite you to participate and add to the ongoing dialogue between academics of both countries. In order to expand this ‘dynamic and burgeoning’ corridor, we need to constantly share ideas on new initiatives and best practices. Sessions at ‘Synergy’ are intended to encourage frank and candid discussion and allow  sharing of experiences and an understanding on what works (and what doesn’t) via a medium of workshops, presentations and panel discussions in a multitude areas.

Attendees at past ‘Synergy’ Conferences have tended to be senior level administrators and academics from both countries and your presentation should take that into consideration. You can make a safe assumption that they have a basic knowledge of and | or are already involved in the ‘Canada-India education corridor’. This session could be a great opportunity to highlight / showcase your academic programs and/or get feedback from your peers in the audience.

Finally, please indicate the length of your presentation/workshop (20 or 30 minutes each) and specify if you require AV and/or other technical equipment. A laptop, projector & screen will be made available.

Potential Criteria for Choosing Presentations: 
  1. Clearly outline the context for the presentation, the target audience it wishes to address and should have a direct relevance to current issues relating to the theme/title of your presentation.
  2. Presentation should have a good mix of obvious practical applications and identify whether it is suitable for newcomersor geared toward experienced professionals.
  3. Present a clear argument & articulate your position (for or against & have moderator sum up the ‘round table’).

Please send us a 50 word (mini) session description to info@CanadaIndiaEducation.com by May 31, 2016 along with your session title and names of co-presenters (if any)  and we will follow up/notify you if we have questions.  All (co) presenters and panelists will receive discounted registration fee at the member rate.

Look back at Synergy 2015 & view the Event Agenda…

I Took the Decision of Offering Myself the Greatest Gift: I Went to Study Abroad

I Took the Decision of Offering Myself the Greatest Gift: I Went to Study Abroad

Guest Contributor: Marie-Frédérique Ouellet

 

While taking a sip of my masala chai with alu paratha, I am staring at these kids throwing colorful powder at each other, laughing and running in every direction. The city is calm, the sun is clear and the air is fresh. So much to see, so much to taste, so much to discover: Welcome to India.

Even after two years, some people still ask with stupefaction, why I left Canada for India to pursue my Master’s Degree and if I did not have universities in my own country. Most of the time I quickly answer that I came to India to specialize in agriculture economics and Indo-Canadian relations but that is just one part of the truth. The other part is that after my undergraduate program, I made the decision of offering myself the greatest gift: I went to study abroad. I chose myself for two years. A gift from yourself to yourself that changes your whole perception of life and its intrinsic value. Studying abroad leaves you by yourself with your knowledge, culture and values in the middle of a whole new world where the culture is different, the religions are different, the language and food habits are different, where everything is to discover. The real challenge is to find the strength to adapt in this new world without losing who you are.

After my studies in International Economics and Development at the University of Ottawa, I wanted to become an economist. Specifically, I wanted to become a development economist. The kind that can bring efficient economic solutions and alternatives based on a deep understanding of the social, cultural and historical background. After my third year of Bachelor’s Degree, I was selected by the Ontario/Maharashtra Goa Student Exchange Program to pursue the Student India Program in Symbiosis International University in Pune, India. I came back to Canada to finish my last year of undergraduate studies and started to prepare my application to conduct a Master’s Degree in India. After my graduation, I received the Commonwealth Scholarship Plan in collaboration with the Indian Council for Cultural Relations and the Department of Foreign Affairs of Canada, which gave me the opportunity to pursue the Master’s Degree in Economics at Hyderabad Central University in India.

It took me almost a year to plan and prepare what was going to be the biggest trip of my life, with myself as my only travel partner and my humility and curiosity as carrying luggage. To anyone thinking about pursuing a degree or a semester abroad, few steps can guide you:

lmap1) Choose a country, read about its culture, history and social development. See if it peaks your curiosity to the point where you are determined to live and experince it by yourself.


2)
Look for the different educational programs that are offered by the host country and if the diploma obtained abroad will be recognized by your home country or own institution. You can discuss with your teachers and determinethe added-value of this diploma to your career. Discuss with your parents and friends about your project, ask their opinion and determine the pros and cons.

3) Look for scholarships offered by the Provincial and Federal governments, such as the Department of Global Affairs Canada, NGOs, organizations for international studies, LOGIQ for students from Quebec, Indian Council for Cultural Relations, Canada India Education Council, Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute, Commonwealth Scholarship Plan, Ontario/Maharashtra Goa Student Exchange Program. Also, many Canadian universities are offering scholarships to students willing to complete a semester abroad.

4) Construct a budget of the expected expenditures and fees. Try to determine the total cost of this project, including flight tickets, visa fees, accommodations and living expenditures, fix a budget if you want to travel across the country. By preparing your project in advance, you can find many helpful ideas, you can ask for the flight tickets as birthday or graduation gift from your family and friends, save money from part-time work to achieve this specific goal, work with NGOs and seek out sponsorships. If there is no solution, it is because there was no problem at the beginning.

5) Make an appointment at a travel health clinic. The specialists will give you advice and preventions for the specific country you will travel to, discuss with your doctor about the different options to ensure your security abroad. For example, ask about the prevention of malaria, hepatitis, rabies, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and if you should receive any specific vaccine before leaving.

6) Learn more about the culture, the university where you will study, the basic courtesies of the country, watch documentaries on the social challenges the country is facing, learn more about their history and language. The better your preparation, the easier your adaptation to this new environment will be.

7) Enjoy, learn, share and make a lot of friends.


lmapI hope this article brings to you the fire required to conduct what I believe is the biggest trip of your life. You will face challenges, culture shocks and misunderstandings, but you need to look beyond that. You will discover a new culture, make life-long friends, learn a new language, you will see landscapes that you can normally only see in movies. The memories and friendships created will remain long after the completion of your studies. By the way, the picture was taken in Munnar, Kerala in December 2015. Yes, life as an international student is pretty boring as you can see 😉  Give it a try, you will be surprised!

Canadian Colleges Take on India Skills Development

Source: The PIE News

Canadian educators have partnered with the National Skill Development Corporation of India to undertake part of the mammoth task of upskilling India’s youth population. With the NSDC responsible for training 150 million young people by 2022, this month it has signed 13 memoranda of understanding.

The MoUs, 12 of which with Canadian colleges as well as an umbrella MoU with Colleges and Institutes Canada, will facilitate collaborations for skill development in a variety of different sectors, including water, aviation and hydrocarbon.

The agreements were endorsed by both Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi during the latter’s visit to Canada last week, the first in 42 years.

In 2009, under the National Policy on Skill Development in India, a target to train 500 million people before 2022 was set and the NSDC has been charged with training 150 million.

Cynthia Murphy, director of the Canadian Immigrant Integration Programme at Colleges and Institutes Canada, told The PIE News that with the looming deadline, development under these MoUs is moving very quickly.

“We all know of MoUs that are signed that don’t have a lot of activity – that’s not happening with this group,” she said.

“The NSDC is incredibly motivated and keen to get work happening under these MoUs. Each institution set its own goals within its own sector, but the time frame is of the essence.”

According to CIC figures, last year Canadian colleges and institutes hosted more than 8,000 Indian students– more than the number at universities, language schools, primary and secondary schools combined.

Education in general was one of the key areas that both Prime Ministers agreed to prioritise for bilateral engagement.

Canada also listed India as one of the priority countries to work with in its international education strategy last year.

Modi’s visit followed trips to Germany and France where he signed a two-year residence permit for Indian graduates with French president Francois Holland.

Murphy said that while on this trip Modi connected with the diaspora, but also with business and industry.

“It’s very much about building partnerships in several key sectors, and education being one of them,” she said. “It’s on the government’s agenda, it’s one of the priorities listed, and it is incredibly important to both countries.”

Despite the initial momentum of the collaborations, Husain Neemuchwala, CEO of the Canada-India Education Council said Modi has a lot to prove in the face of India’s upskilling needs.

“The government has only been in power for the past ten months or so,” he commented. “I think there’s tremendous scope and lots to demonstrate the intent as well as the ability to get things accomplished.”

He added: “I think there’s a lot to undertake at this point to demonstrate that they are able and capable and they mean what they say.”

Indo-Canadian MoUs to Help Skilling in Apparel Sector

Source: Fibre2Fashion

India and Canada have signed two different memorandum of understanding (MoUs) for skill development in the apparel sector, the apex apparel exporters body, Apparel Export Promotion Council, (AEPC) said in a statement today.

The agreements were signed during the recent visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Canada.

Dr A Sakthivel, Chairman Apparel, Made-Ups & Home Furnishing Sector Skill Council (AMH SSC) signed an MoU with Bruce Wilson, President, Fanshawe College, Canada for transfer of expertise in the field of Training of Trainers and other fields.

The MoU envisages greater cooperation between the Canadian partner and AMH SSC, whereby, Fanshawe College will share their expertise in the training of trainers and other fields in the skilling process.

This will result in availability of larger number of Quality Master Trainers which in turn, will ensure quality training in skilling in the apparel sector.

Dr Sakthivel also signed another MoU with Husain F Neemuchwala of the Canada India Education Council (CIEC) to access expertise in the field of skilling in the apparel sector.

CIEC Facilitates PM Modi Visit in Toronto

India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi made a much anticipated stop in Toronto, Canada for a Community Reception during his three-nation tour. This marked the first time an Indian PM visited Canada in 42 years. The PM was eager to meet his Canadian counterpart Stephen Harper as well as address the Indo-Canadian community during his visit to Canada.

Canada India Education Council has joined the National Alliance of Indo-Canadians (NAIC) as a Welcoming Partner for this historic event which will be attended by several CIEC members and guests.

From: National Post

The thousands in attendance were full of excitement as they chanted “Modi! Modi!” However in the midst of the celebrations business was still attended to. Various agreements were signed and ties between the nations were further strengthened.

Modi was quoted as saying “Canada is a major Asia-Pacific power and should play a more active role, including in regional institutions.” Harper said about the relationship between Canada and India, “It’s not where we want it to be, but it’s growing.”

From: Metro News

At the event, Harper welcomed Modi as an individual “with humble roots and a devout spirit”. Modi then came to the stage, thanking the Indo-Canadian community for all they have done in terms of “enhancing the glory of India” abroad.

CIEC and Stephen Harper Attend the 14th National Diwali Celebration in Toronto

On October 18, 2014, Prime Minister Stephen Harper, along with Husain F. Neemuchwala (CIEC – CEO) & Kalpa Pathak (CIEC – Director of Public Affairs & Member Services) took part in the 14th National Diwali Celebration at the Hindu Sabha Mandir in Brampton, Canada.

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