UAlberta Turns to India for Partnerships, Exchanges

Source: Edmonton Journal via Academica

The University of Alberta has moved to significantly bolster its ties with India, reports the Edmonton Journal. Late last year, UAlberta President David Turpin led a small delegation to Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai, and Delhi to secure new agreements, build on existing partnerships, and meet prospective international students through conferences and youth forums. “For so many years, when people thought about studying abroad, they thought about the UK and USA,” says Turpin. “But Canada in India right now is on the ascendancy.” UAlberta has reportedly signed a number of new partnerships with Indian institutions, which include an agreement to allow 10 Indian PhD candidates from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to pursue up to a year of joint study at UAlberta.

Canadian Uni Seeks to Absorb U.S. Students Affected by #MuslimBan

Source: Study International

The University of Ottawa announced yesterday that the university was “deeply concerned” about American President Donald Trump’s executive orders and have thus “immediately sought ways” to help any students or academics who are affected.

Canada Beckons International Students With a Path to Citizenship

Source: New York Times

At the College of the North Atlantic here, a young Chinese woman stood discussing her future with two fellow students, a Bangladeshi man and a Korean woman, amid a flow of mostly pale Newfoundlanders in down coats and hoodies heading for class.

There’s No Canadian Harvard, and That’s A Good Thing

Source: National Post via Academica

“There is no Canadian equivalent of Harvard, with its prestige, limited enrollment and its $60,000 tuition. And really, it’s just as well,” writes Stephen Gordon for the National Post. Gordon argues that while some Canadian universities and programs have high entrance standards, gaining admission into one of these programs is “nowhere near as difficult as entering an elite U.S. college.” Gordon sees this characteristic of Canadian higher ed in a positive light, arguing that that social mobility is likely enhanced by the fact the the country’s higher education institutions are not as rigidly stratified as those in the US. “If—as available evidence suggests—Canadian social mobility is significantly greater than it is in the U.S., then much of the credit goes to the fact that there is no Canadian university that plays the prestige-signalling game that Harvard does,” concludes Gordon. “A ‘Harvard of Canada’ is the last thing we need.”

BC Should Look to India for International Students

Source: The Province via Academica

PSE institutions in British Columbia would be wise to “cultivate new markets” for international student enrolment and avoid becoming overly dependent on China, according to a US-based analyst. Rahul Choudaha tells The Province that despite a recent jump in the number of Chinese international students coming to BC, this growth—and the overall growth in international student numbers—is slowing. However, India stands out as an exception to this slowdown, says Choudaha, who notes that enrolments from India grew 25% last year, outpacing the growth rate of Chinese enrolments. “Given the scale and the growth potential of India as a source of international students, Canadian institutions have an untapped potential in recruiting Indian students at the bachelor’s level,” the analyst concludes.

Canada Overtakes UK as ‘Most Desirable’ Country for EU Students

Source: Times Higher Education

Canada has overtaken the UK as the most attractive English-speaking country for European Union students, according to a study that highlights the damaging impact of the Brexit vote on the UK university sector. A survey of 219 international students at universities in the UK found that Canada was the most desirable English-speaking nation for EU students, followed by the UK, Australia, the US and New Zealand in last place.

For the complete article, visit Times Higher Education.

Many Immigrant Students Lack English skills, but Achieve Comparable GPAs

Source: Seneca College via Academica

What role does an immigrant’s region of origin and English language proficiency have on their academic and employment outcomes? This is the question that researchers at Seneca College’s Centre for Research in Student Mobility explore in a new report. The study followed the pathways of 18,466 students (non-international) who entered Seneca College between 2010 and 2014 within five years of leaving an Ontario high school. The study found that Seneca students who were born outside of Canada were more likely than their Canadian-born peers to have highly educated parents, live in lower-income neighbourhoods, and to aspire to university. Despite having attended an ON high school, many immigrants come to Seneca with weak English-language skills requiring support in language proficiency, with 59% being placed below college level English, compared to 36% of Canadian born students. Despite this, however, these students achieve similar overall GPAs and graduation rates.