New Dynamic Era of India-Canada Relations

Source: New Delhi Times

Jordan Reeves, Consul General of Canada in Mumbai says that he is upbeat about the rise of Canadian equity investment in India. He further says that Canadian investors are bullish on the Indian economy as is evident from the fact that they have made around $11 billion investment in India in the last year. Canada is also a major collaborator towards the realisation of the skill initiative. In April 2015, during PM Modi’s visit to Canada, education and skills development were identified as priorities. Thirteen MoUs were signed between India’s National Skill Development Council and Canadian colleges and institutes to formalise skills collaboration in various sectors. Modi also agreed to take concrete measures to expand bilateral cooperation in key areas including the economy, trade and investment, civil nuclear cooperation, energy, education and skills development, agriculture, defence and security, science, technology, innovation and space, culture, and people to people tie.

For the full article, visit the New Delhi Times.

Program to Help International Students Engage with Montreal

Source: Journal de Montreal via Academica

Several thousand international students will have newfound access to free cultural activities through a new “passport” program spurred by the city’s universities. The International Student MTL Passport program aims to encourage Montreal’s 28,000 international university students to enjoy the “cultural wealth of the city” by distributing maps and providing the students with free access sites such as the Biodôme, the Botanical Garden, the Insectarium, and the Planetarium. They will also be offered credits to participate in a number of other events at reduced cost. “We want to decompartmentalize the students, get them out of their campuses,” said Nadine Gelly, general manager of the cultural promotion organization La Vitrine, which helped launch the project.

Changes to Immigration Policy Offer Benefits to Students with Canadian Degrees

Source: Canadian Business via Academica

Canada has introduced new changes to its immigration policy that will provide additional advantages to international students with Canadian degrees. The changes award additional points within Canada’s Express Entry system to applicants whose degrees were obtained in Canada. Previously, applicants could earn up to 150 points for their educational qualifications, and the only advantage for those who studied in Canada was not having to prove the equivalency of their degrees. Under the new system, applicants with a Canadian educational credential will get up to 30 additional points. “It’s going to be a boon to international students who have studied here—it’s going to give them a big leg up,” says immigration lawyer Tamara Mosher-Kuczer.

Canada Sees 5.4% Increase in International Students in 2015

Source: Study International

In 2015, Canada increased the number of study permits issued to international students by 5.4%, according to official government data. In a report compiled by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, it was revealed that 125,783 new study permits were granted to international students last year. The Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration also showed that the number of foreign students applying for study permits in the same year had increased by 6.4 percent from the previous year to 187,968.

For the complete article, please visit Study International.

Canada Will Profit By Providing More Opportunities to International Grads

Source: Conference Board of Canada via Academica

Canada must encourage more international students to stay and work in the country if it wants to make the most of their economic potential, according to a new report from the Conference Board of Canada. The report highlights how international students generate up to $10B annually in economic activity and account for 11% of total postsecondary enrolments in Canada. The report argues that Canada would benefit economically by changing immigration policy to help more international students work in the country after graduation. “International students generate billions of dollars of economic activity at Canadian Post-Secondary institutions and in the surrounding communities. They also provide considerable social and cultural value to Canada,” said Conference Board Vice-President, Industry and Business Strategy Michael Bloom. “On the other hand, the great majority of international students do not stay in Canada after their studies and hence do not employ their skills and expertise in our economy.”

Canada Needs Better Data if it Wants to be An Innovation Leader

Source: Globe & Mail

At a recent conference in Ottawa, where speakers included Finance Minister Bill Morneau, Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains and Advisory Council on Economic Growth chair Dominic Barton, a challenge was laid on the table.

We live in a low-growth world and Canada is not immune – we’ve experienced sluggish growth for much of the past decade and our GDP growth rate is not predicted to breach the coveted 3-per-cent mark without bold action now.

So what do we do?

For the full article, visit The Globe & Mail.

Nova Scotia Could Do More to Keep International Students

Source: CBC via Academica

A new pilot program announced by the Nova Scotia Government to keep international students in the province is a “very encouraging” step, yet it does not fully address the barriers most commonly faced by these students, says the Canadian Federation of Students for Nova Scotia. The government pilot in question aims to support 50 international students who are completing their final year of PSE in “priority areas” such as health care, computer engineering, and ocean sciences. These supports includes career mentoring, access to employment-related events, and workshops. Yet the CFS-NS says that these efforts do not address the issues of “differential fees” paid by international students, and access to medical services insurance coverage. “What we really need is broader action that will help international students studying in Nova Scotia across the board,” said CFS-NS Chairperson Charlotte Kiddell.

Canada Eyes New Visa to Attract Talented Workers

Source: Bloomberg

Canada is considering introducing a “global talent visa” to attract high-skill workers, though the country remains divided on expanding immigration amid pockets of high regional unemployment, Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains says.

For the full article, visit Bloomberg.

“Big Investment” Coming for BC Postsecondary Tech Training

Source: The Globe & Mail via Academica

British Columbia Premier Christy Clark has announced that her government will soon make “big investments” in the province’s postsecondary system to address a talent shortage in the tech sector. “There will be some announcements coming in the next little while with respect to investing in computer science in particular in universities … it will be a significant amount,” Clark added in an interview with the Globe and Mail. In July 2016, 18 BC tech executives sent a letter to Clark asking for the province to address the talent shortage. Clark did not specify, however, whether the final amount invested in PSE tech training would match the $100M requested by the executives.

UAlberta Students Hold Turban-Tying Event in Reaction to Posters

Source: Edmonton Journal via Academica

In response to the recently discovered and removed racist posters on campus, the Sikh Students’ Association and the World Sikh Organization of Canada held a turban-tying event called “Turban, eh?” in the University of Alberta Students’ Union building. The event invited any interested persons to have a turban tied on their heads, and provided the opportunity for participants to ask the volunteers questions. Faculty, staff, and students from UAlberta were joined by politicians and community members for the event. UAlberta President David Turpin commented that he was filled with pride at the event, stating that “it really is an opportunity to stand up and say what it means to be Canadian.”

Canada Sees Steady Growth in International Student Numbers

Source: Edmonton Journal via Academica

The past five years show a “national trend toward a steady rise in the number of overseas students arriving in Canada,” reports the Edmonton Journal. The article notes that Manitoba has nearly doubled the number of international students studying in the province since 2011-12, while Alberta has seen a 40% increase and Saskatchewan has seen a 24% increase over the same period. The article highlights how specific institutions in AB have promoted themselves to international students and how they benefit from growing international cohorts. “Internationalization is important because the world is becoming more globalized and it’s important that students and staff have the capabilities to work well with each other,” says NorQuest College Chair of Graduate Studies Ron Horton.

How Canada Will Produce the 150,000 Tech Experts It Needs

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

Canada will require a historic effort to supply the number of tech experts it needs to be a world economic leader in the 21st-century, write Stephen Lake and Sarah Prevette for the Globe and Mail. The authors outline four strategies that Canada can use to produce an additional 150,000 tech experts in the near future, which include making coding part of the education curriculum as early as elementary school; expanding postsecondary co-op programs; fighting for gender equality and parity, particularly in the STEM disciplines; and encouraging immigration.

Canada Student Visa Policy Changes Worry NS Language Schools

Source: CBC via Academica

A recent change to international student visa requirements has caused concern among Nova Scotia’s English language schools, reports CBC. Introduced in July, the new legislative changes require international students in Canada to obtain a second visa before moving from secondary to postsecondary school. “What happened before the changes is students could apply for language training and university training and receive one study permit to cover the whole of the time that they were going to be in Canada,” says Sheila Nunn, president of East Coast School of Languages in Halifax. “This gave them the confidence that they knew that they would go on to the university, they didn’t have to apply for any other paperwork.” Nunn adds that the new regulations might jeopardize pathways programs currently established at NS universities.

McGill signs MoU with Indian University to Establish Infectious Disease Centre

Source: Times of India via Academica

McGill University has partnered with India’s Manipal University to launch the new Manipal McGill Center for Infectious Diseases. A recently signed MoU commits both schools to supporting collaboration on research and training initiatives relating to the study and treatment of infectious and tropical diseases. The Times of India reports that both schools have major strengths in the study of these diseases and that the new MoU builds on research collaborations already being undertaken by the schools. Manipal Vice-Chancellor Vinod Bhat declared in his inaugural address that the Centre will work to inform the scientific community, guide policy makers, and provide public health education.

Canada Introduces New Visa Process for Conditional Admissions

Source: ICEF Monitor

The Canadian government has quietly introduced an important change to how it processes visas for students entering Canada to pursue conditional admissions or pathway programmes. Under the new processing policy, visa officers are instructed to issue a study permit – that is, a Canadian study visa – only for the period of the student’s prerequisite studies. After successfully concluding any such preparatory studies, the student will now be asked to apply for a further study permit to cover the period of their planned academic programme. This is a departure from the previous practice which saw visa officers issue a single study permit for the entire duration of both programmes.

For the complete article, please visit ICEF Monitor.

Languages Canada Calls for Pan-Canadian Approach to International Ed

Source: ICEF Monitor

A recent survey from Languages Canada reveals that Canada witnessed a decline in English Language Teaching enrolments in 2015. According to the research, the number of students studying English in Canada was reduced from 137,416 in 2014 to 133,910 in 2015. These results represent an overall drop of 6.31% over the four years from 2012 to 2015. “International researchers have remarked that the global language travel sector growth is slowing down. This year’s annual survey report confirms the predictions,” said Languages Canada Executive Director Gonzalo Peralta. “However, it is clear now that Canada’s language education sector is not simply slowing in growth, it is underperforming. Not only have we failed to keep pace, we have actually shrunk.”

Canada Needs to Create More “Globally Competent” Graduates

Source: The Globe & Mail via Academica

“Business leaders want to hire graduates with international skills and perspectives, who are comfortable working across languages and cultures,” says Universities Canada President Paul Davidson. Yet challenges remain for the more than 80% of Canadian universities who have “internationalization” as part of their strategic plans. Recent data shows that only 3% of Canadian university students study abroad, and the article details some of the efforts that Canadian schools are making to help boost these participation rates.

New Data Reveals Major Slowdown in Canadian Growth

Source: The PIE News

New international student intake growth in Canada is slowing, standing at 4.5% in 2015 – less than half the year-over-year growth rates reported in 2014 and earlier. The figures mean that universities can no longer be complacent when it comes to attracting international students, according to the Illuminate Consulting Group, which compiled the figures.

For the full article, please visit The PIE.

Canada Looks To Overseas Students To Rejuvenate Ageing Population

Source: Times Higher Education

Mohamed Lachemi is the kind of immigrant Canada wants. “I came to Canada as an international student exactly 30 years ago,” he tells Times Higher Education. “Canada attracted me not just to study but to stay.” He is now the vice-chancellor of industry-focused Ryerson University in downtown Toronto and, in line with federal plans, wants to become “more aggressive” in attracting international students to his institution. Ryerson aims to double its numbers over the next three to five years.

In Canada, official policy, as well as political rhetoric, is… welcoming. In 2014 the country set out plans to attract 450,000 international students by 2022, roughly double the numbers in 2011.

For the full article, please visit Times Higher Education.

Canada Risks a Damaged Reputation Due To Student Visa Fraud

Source: Times Higher Education via Academica

Canada has the “softest” approach to screening for student visa fraud, according to a recent study of four countries that are popular destinations for international students. Ellie Bothwell of Times Higher Education reports that according to the study, Canada’s provincially led system for awarding degrees “can allow more room for corruption” and has allegedly “damaged” the country’s international reputation. Report author Rachael Merola argues that Canada must take a more proactive approach to dealing with student visa fraud if it wishes to remain a top destination for students.

MSVU and Venor Partner to Keep International Grads in NS

Source: Mount Saint Vincent University via Academica

Mount Saint Vincent University has partnered with Venor in an effort to help international student graduates find employers and opportunities to start their careers in Nova Scotia. The partnership marks the latest step in the Nova Scotia Scholars Program, which provides personalized career plans that include career building, networking, work experience, and immigration support for participants. “The Mount is committed to assisting international students who choose to remain in the province,” said Paula Barry Mercer, Associate Vice President of Student Experience at MSVU. “Keeping more graduates in Nova Scotia is an important step in helping to ensure the future prosperity of our province.”

Canada Must Work Quickly to Address Barriers for International Students

Source: University Affairs via Academica

Canada needs to act fast in order to gain the economic benefits associated with international students, writes Kareem El-Assal for University Affairs. Some barriers currently in place in Canada may deter prospective international students and steer them in another country’s direction. Obstacles such as slow student visa processing times, inadequate settlement and integration services, and difficulty attaining permanent residency are among issues potentially hindering Canada’s ability to recruit international talent. While the government has implemented a number of strategies to combat these issues, El-Essal says that further immediate action is required to ensure the successful recruitment and retention of future skilled workers to Canada.

Canadian Higher Ed Places 5th in QS System Strength Rankings 2016

Source: QS Top Universities via Academica

Quacquarelli Symonds has released its new Higher Education System Strength Rankings, and Canada’s system has ranked fifth overall. QS describes the new rankings as “an assessment of overall system strength and flagship university performance, alongside factors relating to access and funding.” The United States led the overall rankings, followed by the UK, Germany, and Australia. While Canada ranked fourth overall in the “Access” category, it ranked ninth in the “Economic” and “System” categories.

International Medical Residents Struggle with Culture Shock

Source: National Post via Academica

Graduates of foreign medical schools often face a significant clash of cultures when they pursue two-year family medicine residencies in Canada, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Alberta and University of Calgary. The report notes that while Canada relies heavily on international medical graduates, many of these graduates may struggle with unfamiliar cultural experiences, such as being taught by female instructors, working with the mentally ill, and having difficulty with the nuances of English. “In some countries, males look after males and females look after females,” said Olga Szafran, associate research director in the University of Alberta’s family-medicine department and the study’s lead author, “but we can’t be selective in the kind of patients that our physicians end up treating.”

Canada Must Better Prepare Grads for Globalized Careers

Source: Vancouver Sun via Academica

“Today, our graduates are competing with their peers all over the world for the jobs of tomorrow,” writes Christa Ovenell, director and principal of Fraser International College, and Canada’s students will need to thrive in a globalized workforce if they wish to remain relevant in a 21st-century economy. Instead of trying to provide massive numbers of domestic students with international experience via study abroad, Ovenell suggests that Canada should focus more on attracting international students to a greater number of Canadian institutions. Despite the growing number of international students studying in Canada, Ovenell concludes, “those international students are densely concentrated at only a handful of institutions, resulting in a deficit of experience for the vast majority of our domestic students.”

Canadian Government Signals Renewed Openness to International Students

Source: University Affairs

According to Amit Chakma, president of [CIEC Academic Member] Western University and chair of the federal government’s Advisory Panel on Canada’s International Education Strategy, the Canadian government has recently shown positive signs towards international students hoping to study in Canada. By reviewing the steps these students must take to achieve permanent residency, in addition to changes made to citizenship requirements, Canada aims to make it easier for these students to pursue an education and work in the country after graduating.

For the full article, please visit University Affairs.

Millennials Learn Differently, Rank Canada Best Country in the World

Source: Inside Higher Ed and U.S. News & World Report via Academica

The changes in the way that young people learn is “forcing the educational system to adapt to the learners, and not vice versa,” writes Sophia Sanchez for Inside Higher Ed. The author argues that such change means that educators need to better understand how members of the Millennial generation differ from those who came before. Among their attributes, reports Sanchez, are shorter attention spans, a preference for collaborative learning, and a drive for instant gratification. To help address these changes, Sanchez recommends that educators establish clear learning outcomes, deliver knowledge in small doses, and use a mix of different teaching methods. A recent survey from the US News & World Report’s “Best Countries” platform has also shown that Millennials (aged 18 to 35) from around the globe view Canada as the best country in the world.

Synergy 2016: Call for Proposals

In keeping with past ‘Synergy’ events (organized since 2007) which have tended to attract thought leaders from leading Colleges and Universities, we invite you to participate and add to the ongoing dialogue between academics of both countries. In order to expand this ‘dynamic and burgeoning’ corridor, we need to constantly share ideas on new initiatives and best practices. Sessions at ‘Synergy’ are intended to encourage frank and candid discussion and allow  sharing of experiences and an understanding on what works (and what doesn’t) via a medium of workshops, presentations and panel discussions in a multitude areas.

Attendees at past ‘Synergy’ Conferences have tended to be senior level administrators and academics from both countries and your presentation should take that into consideration. You can make a safe assumption that they have a basic knowledge of and | or are already involved in the ‘Canada-India education corridor’. This session could be a great opportunity to highlight / showcase your academic programs and/or get feedback from your peers in the audience.

Finally, please indicate the length of your presentation/workshop (20 or 30 minutes each) and specify if you require AV and/or other technical equipment. A laptop, projector & screen will be made available.

Potential Criteria for Choosing Presentations: 
  1. Clearly outline the context for the presentation, the target audience it wishes to address and should have a direct relevance to current issues relating to the theme/title of your presentation.
  2. Presentation should have a good mix of obvious practical applications and identify whether it is suitable for newcomersor geared toward experienced professionals.
  3. Present a clear argument & articulate your position (for or against & have moderator sum up the ‘round table’).

Please send us a 50 word (mini) session description to info@CanadaIndiaEducation.com by May 31, 2016 along with your session title and names of co-presenters (if any)  and we will follow up/notify you if we have questions.  All (co) presenters and panelists will receive discounted registration fee at the member rate.

Look back at Synergy 2015 & view the Event Agenda…

Nonstop Delhi-Vancouver Flights to Start This Year

Source: The PIE News

Educators in British Columbia predict a new Air Canada flight between Delhi and Vancouver starting this autumn will benefit academic partnerships and hope it will entice more Indian students to the province.

To view the full article, please visit The PIE News.

PEI to Include International Students in Mentorship Program

Source: CBC via Academica

PEI has announced that it will expand its mentorship program for recent graduates to include applications from international students, giving them better access to the PEI workforce. Skills PEI contributes up to 50% of wage costs for the first year of employment for postsecondary graduates who are enrolled in the mentorship program. “Hopefully they join the companies, help the company grow, and they will stay here on Prince Edward Island,” said Richard Brown, PEI’s Minister of Workforce and Advanced Learning, “the company grows, the economy grows, it’s good for Prince Edward Island.”

UOIT Signs MOU with Chandigarh University

Source: University of Ontario Institute of Technology via Academica

The University of Ontario Institute of Technology has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Chandigarh University, a private institution in northwestern India. UOIT has outlined a number of areas of potential co-operation between the two institutions, including short-term faculty mobility opportunities to CU, two-way student mobility between campuses, and research and development projects. Vice President, Research, Innovation and International at UOIT Michael Owen says, “the agreement with Chandigarh University paves the way for the development of student exchanges, student internships, and new faculty research endeavours between both universities.”

Students Weigh in On International Integration

Source: Academica Forum

Over the past twenty years the recruitment of international students has become a key priority for many Canadian PSE institutions. Major schools have produced multi-year plans to help make themselves more international, and these plans often give priority to increasing the proportion of international students studying on their campuses. Major figures in higher ed have also warned that the recruitment of international students and the charging of higher tuition fees to this cohort can result in ethical concerns, and have called for enhanced federal guidelines to govern the enrolment of non-Canadian students in Canadian institutions. 

We asked 1,400 StudentVu panelists what they thought about the growing presence of international students on campus, the domestic student-international student relationship, the proportion of international students to domestic students, and other related issues. Our panelists reported that they believed international students had a positive impact on their postsecondary experience; many also expressed support for a school population comprised of 20-40% international students, and voiced concerns about their schools’ treatment of international students.

For the full report, please visit Academica.

Work Permit Program for International Students Needs Reform

Source: The Globe & Mail

A federal government report showing that many international students are working in low-wage jobs after graduation is leading to calls to redesign Canada’s liberal employment rules for foreign graduates.

Canada is unusual among the world’s top destinations for international students in allowing graduates on a work permit to work in any field after they finish their studies. An internal report from Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) found that the post-graduation work permit program (PGWP) was creating a poorly paid, underemployed work force among recent international student graduates at colleges and universities. 

For the full article, visit The Globe & Mail.

Canada Invests $2B in Innovation, Sustainable Growth for PSE

Source: Government of Canada News Release via Academica

Canada’s post-secondary institutions are at the forefront of excellence in science, research and innovation. They help to train the workforce of tomorrow and create the knowledge and insights needed by the private and public sectors to build a clean, sustainable economy.

The Minister of Science, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, today announced that the Government of Canada will launch the application process for a $2-billion fund that will improve research and innovation infrastructure at universities and colleges across the country.

Announced in Budget 2016, the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund will enhance and modernize research facilities on Canadian campuses and improve the environmental sustainability of these facilities. Consultation with the provinces and territories as well as work to implement the initiative as quickly as possible are already under way.

The targeted, short-term investments under the Fund will promote economic activity across Canada and help Canada’s universities and colleges develop highly skilled workers, act as engines of discovery and collaborate on innovations that help Canadian companies compete and grow internationally.

Camosun Signs Multi-year Partnership Agreement with India’s Jain University

Source: Camosun College via Academica

Camosun College has signed an agreement with India’s Jain University committing the two institutions to a multi-year collaboration. A Camosun release states that the agreement will cover three main areas of co-operation: developing a nation-wide sport skills training program; delivery of Camosun’s diploma programs in Sport Management and Exercise & Wellness at Jain University; and transfer agreements to help students complete degrees, diplomas, and post-degree diplomas in Business and Sport disciplines at Camosun’s Victoria campuses. “Our partnership with Jain University signifies Camosun’s growing reputation for excellent curriculum development and education delivery in sport and business sectors,” said Camosun President Sherri Bell.

Ottawa Looks to Ease International Students’ Path to Permanent Residency

Source: The Globe & Mail via Academica

“International students are the best source of immigrants, in the sense that they’re educated, they’re young, they speak English or French, they know something of the country,” says Canada’s Immigration Minister John McCallum, “so we should be doing everything we can do to court them.” McCallum argues that Canada can greatly enhance the opportunities for international students to gain permanent residence by overhauling the current “Express Entry System,” a computerized program that allegedly prioritizes immigrants who are skilled workers and makes it difficult for many to gain permanent residence.

Parliament Introduces Legislation to Ease Citizenship Requirements for International Students

Source: ICEF Monitor via Academica

Canada has introduced legislation that is designed to make it easier for international students to gain citizenship after graduating. The legislation will reportedly repeal a number of changes made by the previous Conservative government under Bill C-24 in June 2015. Some of the new legislation’s most significant changes will be in reducing the period of physical residency required to apply for citizenship, allowing students to count time spent studying in Canada toward their residency requirement, and reviewing the Canadian Experience Class program.

Canada Overhauls International Education Campaign

Source: The PIE News, Study International via Academica

This week, Canada unveiled its new EduCanada branding campaign to represent the country’s global education strategy. The brand was first presented at the annual AIEA conference in Montreal, and features a new logo along with the tagline, “A world of possibilities.” The branding will reportedly appear on all printed education materials from the federal, provincial, and territorial governments, as well as all Canadian universities that operate on an international scale. The new brand comes at the same time as Global Affairs Canada has produced a video promoting the country as one of the world’s top study abroad destinations. Increasing the global influence of Canada’s higher education sector was one of the main goals cited in the 2012 Global Affairs of the federal International Education strategy, which sought to double the number of international students in Canada to 450,000 by 2022.

ON, PEI negotiate PSE agreements with India

Source: Times of India via Academica

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne and PEI Premier Wade MacLauchlan have returned from their 10-day trade mission to India and have negotiated new agreements for postsecondary institutions. According to a press release by the Ontario Government, the ON delegation participated in a signing ceremony announcing agreements involving Ryerson University, McMaster University [CIEC Academic Member], Sheridan College, Algonquin College, and Seneca College. According to Canadian Broadcasting Company, the University of Prince Edward Island signed MOUs with two Indian universities.

Canadian PSE Representatives Travel to India on Trade Mission

Source: Ontario Business Mission to India Press Kit via Academica

Representatives from five Canadian colleges and nine universities have travelled with Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne on a trade mission to India. An ON release states that the purpose of the mission is to “strengthen economic, political and cultural ties with the world’s third-largest economy.” The creation of new institutional partnerships between the two countries features as one of the highest priorities for the participating Canadian PSE institutions. Prince Edward Island Premier Wade MacLauchlan has also joined the mission, along with 12 delegates from that province.

TRU Signs Proposals with Two Indian Universities

Source: Thompson Rivers University via Academica

Thompson Rivers University has signed proposals with two of India’s largest schools, I K Guraj Punjab Technical University and Chandigarh University. The agreements will allow students to complete the first half of a tourism management or computing science program in India, and the second half on TRU’s Kamloops campus. “In the 21st century, the world has become smaller and smaller and we need to provide students the opportunities to gain global competency while exposing our faculty to international collaboration,” said TRU Associate Vice-President International and CEO Global Operations Baihua Chadwick. “I have no doubt these initiatives will enhance TRU’s academic and professional competitiveness.”

India Approves Renewal of Higher Ed MOU with Canada

Source: Business Standard via Academica

India’s Union Cabinet has approved the renewal of an existing MOU with Canada that will commit both countries to enhanced cooperation in higher education. The countries originally signed an MOU in June 2010, which offered the possibility of renewing the agreement for a further five years. The MOU reportedly aims to recognize “the immense potential of collaboration between Higher Education Institutions of Canada and India and to further develop the existing bilateral relations in the field of Higher Education and Research.” Approval for the MOU was issued directly by the Union Cabinet and its chair, Indian Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi.

Globe and Mail Releases 2015 Report on Colleges

Source: Globe & Mail via Academica

The Globe and Mail has released its 2015 Report on Colleges, which aims to provide students considering enrolling in Canadian colleges with the information they need to make an informed decision. The report includes a number of articles covering topics such as curriculum personalization, funding for facilities, and college business incubators. The report also includes a feature story about how many of Canada’s young workers are heading to college in response to the downturn in Canada’s oil sector, highlighting the advantages to be gained from colleges’ collaboration with companies and community organizations.

HEQCO Releases Two Studies on International Students in Canada

Source: HEQCO via Academica

The Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) has released two new studies examining the international student population in Canada, with a particular focus on Ontario. In the report titled “International Students in Ontario’s Postsecondary Education System, 2000-2012,” researchers from Wilfrid Laurier University found that the average international student in Canada is male and attends college in the GTA. While the total number of international students in the country has grown, the number attending college has risen more quickly. In “The Global Competition for International Students as Future Immigrants,” researchers from York University and the University of Guelph explored ways to improve the experience for international students. They found that many ON universities have programs that target first-year students but lack supports for upper-year students. They also documented a need to “enhance interactions between international and domestic students.”

New AB Budget Adds $280M to PSE Funding, Freezes Tuition for 2 Years

Source: Calgary Herald via Academica

The new Alberta budget for 2015–16 will increase funding to the province’s universities, colleges, and technical schools by $280 M compared to last year. The funding will help support a two-year tuition freeze for students, a $40 M boost to base funding for schools, and a $183 M increase in student loans. $581 M of the $5.7 B overall budget will be set aside for eight major campus expansion projects. The funding announcement was met with relief by many higher education stakeholders, including Erik Queenan, President of the Students’ Association at Mount Royal University, who said that students were “really encouraged to hear the government is acknowledging the importance of post-secondary, especially in these turbulent economic times.”

Universities Canada, CICan, CAUT Welcome New Government

Source: Academica

Representatives across Canada’s PSE community have delivered messages of welcome and congratulations to Canada’s new Liberal government. Universities Canada has said that it looks forward to working with Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau “to advance dialogue and action on higher education, research and innovation.” Members of the Canadian Association of University Teachers have also expressed their congratulations, although they urge the incoming government to act quickly on promises made during the campaign, especially as these promises relate to PSE. Among the priorities listed by the CAUT are the restoration of the mandatory long-form census, the “unmuzzling” of Canadian scientists, and the improvement of the Canada Student Grants and Canada Student Loans Program. Colleges and Institutes Canada has said that it hopes the new government will support “innovative training and applied research that make Canada’s colleges and institutes some of the strongest in the world.”

Political Newbie Chandra Arya Wins Seat in Nepean

Source: Ottawa Sun via Ravi Kumar of Hindi Center

Chandra Arya, a former high tech executive with no previous political experience, got a rock star reception as he walked into his Nepean campaign office full of giddy Liberal supporters.

The party was in full swing as people cheered and hugged as the Liberals took over Canada, riding by riding. That was even before Arya, who wanted to show up only after the full results were known, finally arrived.

Ayra, who called the 11-week campaign a “long journey,” saying his priorities include supportingpublic servants and working toward affordable housing.

For the full article, please visit the Ottawa Sun.